Operation Overlord


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Operation Overlord

n
(Military) the codename for the Allied invasion (June 1944) of northern France
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Part of Operation Overlord the D-Day landings, the largest seaborne invasions in history, were a defining moment of the Second World War as the Allies sought, and eventually managed, to liberate France from the clutches of Nazi Germany.
Part of Operation Overlord the D-Day landings, the largest seaborne invasions in history, were a defining moment of World War Two as the Allies sought, and eventually managed, to liberate France from the clutches of Nazi Germany.
He repeatedly frustrates General Dwight Eisenhower (John Slattery), Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery (Julian Wadham) and Field Marshal Alan Brooke (Danny Webb) by stubbornly arguing against Operation Overlord.
He repeatedly frustrates General Dwight Eisenhower (John Slattery), Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery Julian Wadham) and Field Marshal Alan Brooke (Danny Webb) by stubbornly arguing against Operation Overlord.
73 YEARS AGO (1944) Allied troops began landing on the beaches of Normandy on D-Day, in the start of Operation Overlord, the invasion of German-occupied Europe.
JUNE 6, 2017 marks the 73rd anniversary of D-Day, also know as Operation OVERLORD.
Operation Overlord became the greatest air, land, and sea attack in history.
The Kriegsmarine's long and costly effort failed to starve Britain into surrender, stop British supplies from reaching Moscow in time for the battles of December 1941, or prevent Operation Overlord.
It had been put in place to support Operation Overlord on June 6 and troops were tasked with securing important villages as well as bridges.
IN THE SPRING of 1944, Allied leaders were putting the final touches on plans for Operation Overlord, the D-Day invasion into France that would be the first step toward breaking the stranglehold the German army had on Western Europe.
Eisenhower put into Operation Overlord when the allies stormed Normandy.
Winston Churchill recognised that when he insisted on aggressive codenames for military onslaughts such as Operation Overlord for D-Day.
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