opioid

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Related to Opioid analgesic: Analgesic drugs

o·pi·oid

 (ō′pē-oid′)
n.
Any of various compounds that bind to specific receptors in the central nervous system and have analgesic and narcotic effects, including naturally occurring substances such as morphine; synthetic and semisynthetic drugs such as methadone and oxycodone; and certain peptides produced by the body, such as endorphins. Also called opiate.


o′pi·oid′ adj.

opioid

(ˈəʊpɪˌɔɪd)
n
(Physiology)
a. any of a group of substances that resemble morphine in their physiological or pharmacological effects, esp in their pain-relieving properties
b. (modifier) of or relating to such substances: opioid receptor; opioid analgesic.

o•pi•oid

(ˈoʊ piˌɔɪd)

n.
1. any opiumlike substance, as the endorphins produced by the body or the synthetic compound methadone.
adj.
2. pertaining to such a substance.
[1955–60]
Translations

opioid

adj & n opioide m
References in periodicals archive ?
Food and Drug Administration approved Targiniq ER (oxycodone hydrochloride and naloxone hydrochloride extended-release tablets), an extended-release/long-acting (ER/LA) opioid analgesic to treat pain severe enough to require daily, around-the-clock, long-term opioid treatment and for which alternative treatment options are inadequate.
We expect that public and political pressure in the United States will eventually drive a switch of all traditional Schedule II long-acting opioids from forms with no abuse-deterrent properties to all ADF forms, which will dampen the erosion of sales in the opioid analgesic drug class through 2024.
Activation of neurons that descend to the spinal cord takes place when using an opioid analgesic.
Food and Drug Administration today approved Hysingla ER (hydrocodone bitartrate), an extended-release (ER) opioid analgesic to treat pain severe enough to require daily, around-the-clock, long-term opioid treatment and for which alternative treatment options are inadequate.
Whilst the prescription rates of opioid analgesic have seen a historically unprecedented increase over the last two decades, particularly in the US, this has resulted in a dramatic concomitant increase in opioid abuse and dependency.
Treatment with an opioid analgesic between 1 month before and 3 months after conceiving was associated with a significantly increased risk of the following malformations in their infants: conoventricular septal defects (odds ratio, 2.
From 1990 to 1996, medical use of four opioid analgesics increased substantially: morphine (59%), fentanyl (1168%), oxycodone (23%), and hydromorphine (19%), while medical use of one opioid analgesic, meperidine, decreased (35%) (Joranson et al.
7 On each visit, assess whether the opioid analgesic is improving the patient's function and quality of life and whether or not it should be continued.
To test for differences between all beneficiaries in the study population and those with claims for any opioid analgesic or for controlled-release oxycodone, we used t tests for continuous variables and [chi square] tests or Fisher exact tests for categorical variables.
It suggests beginning with a nonopioid medication, adding a weaker opioid and an adjuvant if the first step is insufficient, and incorporating a longer acting, more potent opioid analgesic if pain relief remains insufficient.
In September 2013, the FDA announced a series of post-marketing requirements for manufacturers of ER/LA opioid analgesic products.
Food and Drug Administration today approved new labeling for Embeda (morphine sulfate and naltrexone hydrochloride) extended-release (ER) capsules, an opioid analgesic to treat pain severe enough to require daily, around-the-clock, long-term opioid treatment and for which alternative treatment options are inadequate.