opportunistic infection

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opportunistic infection

n.
An infection by a microorganism or virus that normally does not cause disease but becomes pathogenic when the body's immune system is impaired, as in AIDS patients.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.opportunistic infection - any infection caused by a microorganism that does not normally cause disease in humans; occurs in persons with abnormally functioning immune systems (as AIDS patients or transplant patients receiving immunosuppressive drugs)
infection - the pathological state resulting from the invasion of the body by pathogenic microorganisms
aspergillosis - an opportunistic infection by a fungus of the genus Aspergillus; characterized by inflammation and lesions of the ear and other organs
Translations
maladie opportuniste
References in periodicals archive ?
This family is recognised as opportunistic pathogen having ability to cause infections in humans ranging from mild or acute infections to fulminant infections in host.
The presence, as an opportunistic pathogen, is due to the conditions of the aquatic environment and stress, as reported by Burr et al.
These opportunistic pathogen flare up under conditions of poor hygiene and improper nutrition.
Key words: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, mortality, coliform bacteria, biofilm, opportunistic pathogen, tobramycin, avian, Humboldt penguin, Spheniscus humboldti
Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen of both community-acquired and hospital-acquired infections which rarely causes disease in healthy immunocompetent individuals.
The bacterium is commonly found in natural environments and is considered an opportunistic pathogen (4,10).
It is an opportunistic pathogen and the predominant causative agent in nosocomial infections.
coli is an opportunistic pathogen that mainly colonizes the human gut and sometimes causes intestinal diseases and genitourinary disorders.
difficile is an opportunistic pathogen found in the intestines of approximately 3% of healthy adults and 40% of infants.
Invasion of the human gastrointestinal mucosa by Candida albicans and its passage across the bowel wall into the bloodstream is an important portal of entry for this opportunistic pathogen in the neutropenic host, leading to systemic or disseminated candidiasis [5].
maltophilia is emerging as a significant cause for concern as an opportunistic pathogen associated with nosocomial outbreaks in patients with a range of comorbidities including cystic fibrosis, neutrophenia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, anti-cancer chemotherapy, and organ transplant.
MY15 that has been associated to human as opportunistic pathogen, lack of assignment of majority of reads to lowest taxa indicated the presence of yet uncharacterized organisms.

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