binary star

(redirected from Optical double)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Optical double: Binary star system

binary star

n.
A system of two stars bound together by gravity and orbiting a common center of mass, most often appearing as a single star when visible to the unaided eye. Also called double star.

binary star

n
(Astronomy) a double star system comprising two stars orbiting around their common centre of mass. A visual binary can be seen through a telescope. A spectroscopic binary can only be observed by the spectroscopic Doppler shift as each star moves towards or away from the earth. Sometimes shortened to: binary See also optical double star, eclipsing binary

bi′nary star′


n.
a system of two stars that revolve about their common center of mass.
[1875–80]

binary star

A system of two stars that orbit a common center of mass. The pair often appears as a single star to the unaided eye.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.binary star - a system of two stars that revolve around each other under their mutual gravitation
star - (astronomy) a celestial body of hot gases that radiates energy derived from thermonuclear reactions in the interior
References in periodicals archive ?
Tenders are invited for Design, Supply, Erection and Commissioning of Plant & Machinery of Transesterification unit (50 Liters LPD Per Batch Capacity) and High Performance Imported Optical Double Beam Atomic Absorption Spectmeter.
This pair is actually an optical double, meaning that they are not physically attached at all, they just happen to appear close together from our viewpoint.
In an optical double, one star lies far beyond the other; their appearance of closeness is simply a line-of-sight coincidence.
That binary pair forms a wide optical double, only coincidentally aligned, with 7th-magnitude HD 28782, which lies 442" almost due east.
65 Draconis is itself an optical double with the considerably dimmer HD 190696.
Beta Serpentis is another optical double, tighter but still easily split in low-power binoculars.
This lovely naked-eye optical double adds to the overall fascination of the district around Antares and the head of Scorpius, as shown at left.
The nucleus of the False Comet is a lovely star triangle consisting of the bright, wide, optical double Zeta ([zeta]) Scorpii (magnitudes 3.