binary star

(redirected from Optical double)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Optical double: Binary star system

binary star

n.
A system of two stars bound together by gravity and orbiting a common center of mass, most often appearing as a single star when visible to the unaided eye. Also called double star.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

binary star

n
(Astronomy) a double star system comprising two stars orbiting around their common centre of mass. A visual binary can be seen through a telescope. A spectroscopic binary can only be observed by the spectroscopic Doppler shift as each star moves towards or away from the earth. Sometimes shortened to: binary See also optical double star, eclipsing binary
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bi′nary star′


n.
a system of two stars that revolve about their common center of mass.
[1875–80]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

binary star

A system of two stars that orbit a common center of mass. The pair often appears as a single star to the unaided eye.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.binary star - a system of two stars that revolve around each other under their mutual gravitation
star - (astronomy) a celestial body of hot gases that radiates energy derived from thermonuclear reactions in the interior
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
A study of the relative motion of the components proves this is merely an optical double rather than a genuine binary.
The big dipper has a the two stars Mizar and Alcor which look very close together and are known as an "optical double" but the reality is they're very far apart.
Double star director Dave Blane indicate that Alpha Capricorni is an optical double star with components alpha1 Cap and alpha2 Cap having magnitudes 4.3 and 3.6 respectively.
In an optical double, one star lies far beyond the other; their appearance of closeness is simply a line-of-sight coincidence.
What's really marvelous about Alpha Capricorni is that it's an optical double --that is, two stars at greatly different distances that just happen to be along the same line of sight.
The large difference in proper motion seems to indicate the pair is an optical double.
This pair is actually an optical double, meaning that they are not physically attached at all, they just happen to appear close together from our viewpoint.
That binary pair forms a wide optical double, only coincidentally aligned, with 7th-magnitude HD 28782, which lies 442" almost due east.
65 Draconis is itself an optical double with the considerably dimmer HD 190696.