oracles


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Related to oracles: Sibylline oracles

oracles

(ˈɒrəkəlz)
pl n
another term for Scripture1
References in classic literature ?
Then flinging the already written pages of the Election Sermon into the fire, he forthwith began another, which he wrote with such an impulsive flow of thought and emotion, that he fancied himself inspired; and only wondered that Heaven should see fit to transmit the grand and solemn music of its oracles through so foul an organ pipe as he.
Man cannot KNOW in any higher sense than this, any more than he can look serenely and with impunity in the face of the sun: "You will not perceive that, as perceiving a particular thing," say the Chaldean Oracles.
The only man who would undertake to raid them was a certain excellent seer, {95} but the will of heaven was against him, for the rangers of the cattle caught him and put him in prison; nevertheless when a full year had passed and the same season came round again, Iphicles set him at liberty, after he had expounded all the oracles of heaven.
This little, whining, feast-smelling animal is, therefore, called among Indians the "medicine wolf;" and such was one of Buckeye's infallible oracles.
And Achilles answered, "Fear not, but speak as it is borne in upon you from heaven, for by Apollo, Calchas, to whom you pray, and whose oracles you reveal to us, not a Danaan at our ships shall lay his hand upon you, while I yet live to look upon the face of the earth--no, not though you name Agamemnon himself, who is by far the foremost of the Achaeans.
There are two family oracles, one or other of which Dutch housewives consult in all cases of great doubt and perplexity,--the dominie and the doctor.
I had fancied that the oracles were all silent, and nature had spent her fires; and behold
listened with her bright blue eyes fixed upon the oracles.
all oracles By thee are given, and what confessed more true Among the nations?
Jasper Dale never so much as THOUGHT about a woman," Carlisle oracles declared.
Huge Earth bare these to Epaphus -- soothsaying people, knowing seercraft by the will of Zeus the lord of oracles, but deceivers, to the end that men whose thought passes their utterance (33) might be subject to the gods and suffer harm -- Aethiopians and Libyans and mare-milking Scythians.
But there is no reason to suppose that he is deriding them, any more than he is deriding the phenomena of love or of enthusiasm in the Symposium, or of oracles in the Apology, or of divine intimations when he is speaking of the daemonium of Socrates.