origami

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origami

o·ri·ga·mi

 (ôr′ĭ-gä′mē)
n. pl. o·ri·ga·mis
1. The art or process, originating in Japan, of folding paper into shapes representing flowers and birds, for example.
2. A decorative object made by folding paper.

[Japanese : ori, to fold + kami, paper.]

origami

(ˌɒrɪˈɡɑːmɪ)
n
(Crafts) the art or process, originally Japanese, of paper folding
[from Japanese, from ori a folding + kami paper]

o•ri•ga•mi

(ˌɔr ɪˈgɑ mi)

n.
the Japanese art of folding paper into decorative or representational forms, as of animals or flowers.
[1920–25; < Japanese, =ori fold + -gami, comb. form of kami paper]

origami

the Japanese art of paper folding. — origamist, n.
See also: Art

origami

1. A Japanese word meaning paper folding, used to mean the art of creating ornamental objects by folding paper.
2. The art (originating in Japan) of folding paper.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.origami - the Japanese art of folding paper into shapes representing objects (e.g., flowers or birds)origami - the Japanese art of folding paper into shapes representing objects (e.g., flowers or birds)
artistic creation, artistic production, art - the creation of beautiful or significant things; "art does not need to be innovative to be good"; "I was never any good at art"; "he said that architecture is the art of wasting space beautifully"
Nihon, Nippon, Japan - a constitutional monarchy occupying the Japanese Archipelago; a world leader in electronics and automobile manufacture and ship building
Translations
origami
折り紙折紙

origami

[ˌɒrɪˈgɑːmɪ] Npapiroflexia f

origami

[ˌɒrɪˈgɑːmi] norigami m

origami

nOrigami nt

origami

[ˌɒrɪˈgɑːmɪ] norigami m inv
References in periodicals archive ?
Normally we see things from one side, but we have many aspects - that's why I wanted to show what we are," said Japanese artist Kaz Shirane, who built the Light Oragami Installation.
Zakir Mahmoud and Kevin Bailey race oragami frogs in 2002, left.
Summary: Mark Bolitho has spent hundreds of hours making pop acts into oragami.