Orangeism


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Orangeism

(ˈɒrɪndʒˌɪzəm)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the practices or principles of Orangemen, esp Protestant supremacy in the Republic of Ireland, Northern Ireland, or Canada

Orangeism

the principles of the Orangemen, members of a secret 17th-century Irish society that defended the reigning British monarch and supported the Anglican church.
See also: Protestantism
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References in periodicals archive ?
A NEW PS700,000 heritage centre has been hailed as a "magnificent outreach base for Orangeism in the North-west".
Orangeism helped defeat William Lyon Mackenzie's 1837 rebellion in Upper Canada, and by the time of Canadian Confederation, one-third of all adult male Protestants were members of the organization at some point in their lives.
Orangeism, of course, was a tenet of the Dutch king William El of Orange, who became (together with his wife Mary Stuart) the British ruler who defeated the Catholic James II as king of Ireland.
Allison O'Mahen Malcom makes a very interesting argument that Orangeism hijacked Loyalist values in Upper Canada during the 19th century.
11) They were challenging times with Orangeism rife and significant sectarianism against Catholics.
These secret societies stood in opposition to Orangeism and admitted responsibility for acts of sabotage and violent riots with the Orange Order in the North, or organized resistance to paying tithes to the Protestant Church of Ireland.
73) Certainly there were many opportunities for Scots to interact and socialise--business ventures, religious activities, freemasonry, Orangeism, newspapers, public houses, schools, the Mechanics Institution, even amateur theatricals--but most of these had limited memberships and some of them were sources of division, including the rival Presbyterian churches.
25) As with the paper's proprietor and editor, Shields too would become initiated into the mysteries of Orangeism, becoming a member of Sproule LOL No.
Unionism and Orangeism in Northern Ireland Since 1945: The Decline of the Loyal Family.
Thus inseparable from secular unionism, Orangeism fails in Volf's framework for "belonging without distance.
Concerns about the agency's remit may have been rendered irrelevant by the fact that it has arguably never adhered to it, the most obvious instance being the diversion of funds to promote Orangeism, which has no obvious connection with Scots; (15) it may be illegal under section 75 of the Northern Ireland Act 1998, which outlaws confessional favouritism.
Wherever Orange is Worn : Orangeism and Irish Migration in the 19th and Early 20th Centuries.