Orcagna


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Orcagna

(Italian orˈkaɲa)
n
(Biography) Andrea (anˈdrɛːa), original name Andrea di Cione. ?1308–68, Florentine painter, sculptor, and architect
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Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
Under Orcagna's Loggia--the Loggia de' Lanzi, as we sometimes call it now--'"
I have seen Andrea Orcagna, Taddeo Gaddi, Giottino, Stefano, Simone Memmi--men whose very colors I am not worthy to mix.
Intriguingly, Daddi's Enthroned Madonna, datable to the mid to late 1330s, appears to have been reused by the Orcagna workshop some 30 years later--after the painter's death--and given a new frame, including the lateral pinnacles, the double predella, and the crowning scene of the Apparition of God the Father.
1360 on stylistic and iconographical grounds while assigning them to an anonymous Florentine painter: Levin (The Allegory of Mercy, 47, 76) stipulated this artist as "a follower of Andrea Orcagna," while Earenfight (pp.
The Tabernacle of Orcagna was excluded from this study since its excellent restoration was completed a century ago.
Pre-eminent, both in scholarship, excellent plates and impeccable book production, are the proceedings of a two stage symposium, held in Washington (2005) and Florence (2006) devoted to the past, present and future of the latter city's iconic Orsanmichele and its outstanding collection of Renaissance artworks, including sculptures by Donatello, Ghiberti and Verrocchio and Orcagna's extraordinary marble tabernacle enclosing Daddi's 'Virgin and Child'.
Garrard makes the connection between the dome and the Virgin's breast primarily through Orcagna's domed tabernacle of the Virgin (135-259) and the domed tabernacle over the sculpture group of the Virgin and Child (before 1399), both at Orsanmichele in Florence, where bread was distributed to the poor and the actions of the nourishing Virgin were perhaps nowhere more clear.
The church also houses artwork by some of the greatest Italian Renaissance artists: Giotto, Luca della Robbia, Vasari, Donatello and Andrea Orcagna.