linguistic philosophy

(redirected from Ordinary language philosophy)
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linguistic philosophy

n
(Philosophy) the approach to philosophy common in the mid 20th century that tends to see philosophical problems as arising from inappropriate theoretical use of language and therefore as being resolved by detailed attention to the common use of expressions
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linguistic philosophy

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In contrast to the agenda of ordinary language philosophy, the primary questions in logical positivism were epistemological.
Cavell recasts Emerson and Thoreau as avant-le-lettre kin to ordinary-language philosophers responding to skepticism, but when Duffy recasts Cavell as an apres-le-lettre British romantic, he deemphasizes skepticism and ordinary language philosophy and instead focuses on later Cavell, the Cavell who deploys the terms of receptivity and intimacy, aversive thinking, and perfectionism.
An Ordinary Language Philosopher may reply to Cappelen: Ordinary Language Philosophy does not rest its claims on intuitions.
The focus of this paper is to analyse what Hallen refers to as ordinary language philosophy and explain how it authenticates African philosophy as unique 'species' of philosophy.
Surber emphasizes the contemporary significance of the debates by likening Hamann to Heidegger and Maimon to ordinary language philosophy (96).
Although ordinary language philosophy has waned, this oversimplification is one of its errors from which music theorizers have not profited.
16) In it he acknowledged a finding of Ordinary Language Philosophy that human discourse is an action, and inversely that human action is meaningful action, that is,"une action parlante.
Linguistic Experiments and Ordinary Language Philosophy, NAT HANSEN and EMMANUEL CHEMLA
In terms of style and method, Sandis departs from the unashamedly metaphysical approach that is currently popular in the philosophy of mind and action, and he takes us back to the days of ordinary language philosophy with numerous points and arguments from grammar and language use.
Thankfully, Julia Tanney's forwards to the two volumes of collected essays, as well as her laudable essay 'Rethinking Ryle: A Critical Discussion of The Concept of Mind'--a substantial fifty-page commentary, previously available only as an introduction to the French edition of Ryle's best known work--do much to remedy the myth that Ryle's philosophy consists of an outdated blend of ordinary language philosophy and behaviorism.
Although the essays do not lack arguments, Singer's style, revelatory of his training at Cornell during the middle of the last century, displays more of a tendency toward ordinary language philosophy than is common nowadays.