Oresme


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Oresme

(French ɔrɛm)
n
(Biography) Nicole d' (nikɔl). ?1320–82, French economist, mathematician, and cleric: bishop of Lisieux (1378–82)
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An historical survey sets the context for Latin selections drawn from seventeen authors (Agricola, Alberti, Alhazen, Bacon, Copernicus, de Soto, Euclid, Faventinus, Galvani, Harvey, Isidore of Seville, Kepler, Leibniz, Libavius, Maimonides, Newton, Oresme, Pliny the Elder, Seneca, Vitruvius) who wrote in Latin and three whose works were translated into Latin.
First articulated by Nicholas Oresme, it explains the effects caused by maintaining an artificial exchange rate between two currencies despite the one being devalued and the other not.
The same years also saw the publication of the old Latin translation by William of Moerbeke (Cologne: Heinrich Quentell, 1492) and the French late-medieval one by Nicole Oresme (Paris: Antoine Caillaut et Guy Mercant pour Antoine Verard, 1489).
Copernico, Nicolas (1864), "Monete cudende ratio per Nicolaum", en Wolowski, Louis (ed.), Traite de la premiere invention des monnaies par Nicolas Oresme, et Traite de la monnaie de Copernic, Guillaumin, Paris, pp.
Other texts may have to be found in the history of science sections in general libraries, such as the writing', of Oresme (especially those published by University of Wisconsin Press: Le livre du riel et du monde [trans.
We can read in chapter 2 how music brought Oresme to subtly challenge the traditional geocentric view and how it guided him to think that the heliocentric view might be the right one, all this over the debate of an audible or inaudible earth.