polymer

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Related to Organic polymers: Inorganic Polymers

pol·y·mer

 (pŏl′ə-mər)
n.
Any of numerous natural and synthetic compounds of usually high molecular weight consisting of up to millions of repeated linked units, each a relatively light and simple molecule.

[Greek polumerēs, consisting of many parts : polu-, poly- + meros, part; see (s)mer- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

polymer

(ˈpɒlɪmə) or

polymeride

n
(Elements & Compounds) a naturally occurring or synthetic compound, such as starch or Perspex, that has large molecules made up of many relatively simple repeated units. Compare copolymer, oligomer
polymerism n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pol•y•mer

(ˈpɒl ə mər)

n.
a compound of high molecular weight derived either by the addition of many smaller molecules, as polyethylene, or by the condensation of many smaller molecules with the elimination of water, alcohol, or the like, as nylon.
[1865–70; < Greek polymerḗs having many parts. See poly-, -mer]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

pol·y·mer

(pŏl′ə-mər)
Any of various chemical compounds made of smaller, identical molecules (called monomers) linked together. Some polymers, like cellulose, occur naturally, while others, like nylon, are artificial. Polymers have extremely high molecular weights, make up many of the tissues of organisms, and are used to make such materials as plastics, concrete, glass, and rubber. ♦ The process by which molecules are linked together to form polymers is called polymerization (pə-lĭm′ər-ĭ-zā′shən).
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

polymer

A material containing very large molecules which are built up from a series of small basic units (monomers). There can be between hundreds and hundreds of thousands of basic units in a polymer.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.polymer - a naturally occurring or synthetic compound consisting of large molecules made up of a linked series of repeated simple monomers
chemical compound, compound - (chemistry) a substance formed by chemical union of two or more elements or ingredients in definite proportion by weight
deoxyribonucleic acid, desoxyribonucleic acid, DNA - (biochemistry) a long linear polymer found in the nucleus of a cell and formed from nucleotides and shaped like a double helix; associated with the transmission of genetic information; "DNA is the king of molecules"
ribonucleic acid, RNA - (biochemistry) a long linear polymer of nucleotides found in the nucleus but mainly in the cytoplasm of a cell where it is associated with microsomes; it transmits genetic information from DNA to the cytoplasm and controls certain chemical processes in the cell; "ribonucleic acid is the genetic material of some viruses"
synthetic resin - a resin having a polymeric structure; especially a resin in the raw state; used chiefly in plastics
copolymer - a polymer consisting of two or more different monomers
polyurethan, polyurethane - any of various polymers containing the urethane radical; a wide variety of synthetic forms are made and used as adhesives or plastics or paints or rubber
lignin - a complex polymer; the chief constituent of wood other than carbohydrates; binds to cellulose fibers to harden and strengthen cell walls of plants
polyamide, polymeric amide - a polymer containing repeated amide groups
silicone, silicone polymer - any of a large class of siloxanes that are unusually stable over a wide range of temperatures; used in lubricants and adhesives and coatings and synthetic rubber and electrical insulation
trimer - a polymer (or a molecule of a polymer) consisting of three identical monomers
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
polümeer
polymeeri
重合体高分子
polymeer
polimer

polymer

[ˈpɒlɪməʳ] Npolímero m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

polymer

[ˈpɒlɪmər] npolymère m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

polymer

nPolymer nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

polymer

[ˈpɒlɪməʳ] npolimero
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Request Report Sample @ https://www.factmr.com/connectus/sample?flag=S&rep_id=1187 Rubber to Metal Bonding Agents: Market Segmentation The rubber to metal bonding agents market is segmented on the following basis: By Material: Epoxy Cyanoacrylate Organic Polymers Halogenated Polymers By End Use: Automotive Hoses Mounts Seals Instrument Panels Electrical Transformers Cable Connectors Power Line Insulators Military Tank Pads Defense Missiles Mechanical Bushings Industrial Hydraulic Hoses Storage Tanks Vibration Grommets Rubber to Metal Bonding Agents Market: Regional Outlook Rubber to metal bonding agents have a wide scope of growth in the North American region, which has a fast growing automobile industry and a well-developed military sector.
Lightwave Logic is a development stage company moving toward commercialisation of next generation photonic devices using its high-activity and high-stability organic polymers for applications in data communications and telecommunications markets.
The accumulation of bacteria develops a biofilm, which is a protective matrix made up of organic polymers (EPS): polysaccharides and proteins.
To tackle the below-zero drop in performance and capacity, the team replaced conventional lithium-ion electrodes with organic polymers that do not rely on intercalation--the process of continuously exchanging molecules between the layered electrodes, which slows down as temperature drops.
The developers combine the organic polymers with gold or silver nanoparticles.
The company intends to demonstrate that organic polymers can compete head-to-head with inorganic legacy telecom and datacom devices which currently provide the backbone for the entire infrastructure that converts almost incalculable amounts of electronic (binary) data into pulses of light and back on a daily basis.
These versatile materials, it says, are helping to redefine LED lamp and luminaire designs by enabling more complex shapes, micro-scale optical structures, multifunctional parts and undercuts difficult to achieve with organic polymers or glass.
This gradual shift in the Southeast Asia region will drive the demand for high-end products, such as enzymes, synthetic organic polymers and specialty silicones.
In past few years, major research efforts have been focused on the development of high performance composite materials based on organic polymers and inorganic particles with key emphasis on developing methods to better integrate (or disperse) inorganic fillers into organic polymers.
Mitch Jacoby, C and EN senior correspondent, focuses on the latest research that involves organic polymers, which exhibit key properties that are needed for the next generation of batteries.
Thus, compared to organic polymers like polycarbonate and acrylic, silicones provide a more effective hedge against heat-induced yellowing of optical elements in high-intensity lamp and luminaire designs.