Oriental rug

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Oriental rug

n.
A rug made of wool or silk that is knotted or woven by hand, often in complex and highly stylized designs, and produced in the Middle East and in many other parts of Asia.

O′rien′tal rug′


n.
a rug or carpet woven usu. in Asia and characterized by hand-knotted pile.
Also called O′rien′tal car′pet.
[1880–85]
References in classic literature ?
Cabs were sent for customers; and when one arrived, he was escorted over Oriental rugs to a gilded booth, draped with silken curtains.
They specialize in selling hand made oriental rugs from Iran, Pakistan, India, etc.
During the event, individuals can select from over 300 hand-knotted Oriental rugs in several different sizes, colors & designs including Tribal, Bokhara and Persian rugs from 2'x3' to 10'x14' and runners.
Founded in 1980, Claremont Rug Company has built an inventory comprised of nearly 4000 Oriental rugs, all from the Second Golden Age, ca.
com; Foyer: RUG: Antique, RO's Oriental Rugs of Nashville, Tennessee, rosorientalrugs.
Rex International has been trading globally for the last 20 years dealing in only fine, hand-knotted rugs called oriental rugs.
These will include furniture, oil and watercolour paintings, sculpture, maps and prints, arms and armour, oriental rugs and carpets, silver, china and glass, oriental ceramics, jewellery, watches and objets d'art.
NEW YORK -- The New York Historical Society is currently hosting an exhibition that explores New Yorkers' longtime fascination with Oriental rugs.
History blends with consumer tips on how to select and care for such a rug, offering plenty of insights from a leading dealer in Oriental rugs.
I've learned a lot about rugs going to conferences, speaking at conferences and as a founding member of the American Conference on Oriental Rugs," said Ramsey, who is widely known as a specialist in the oriental rugs and weavings of Turkey, Iran, the Caucasus and Afghanistan.
The owners were sweeping all the dirt under their oriental rugs, until the inevitable happened: a whole team--the Chicago White Sox--was caught selling out the World Series.