Orpheus


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Related to Orpheus: Eurydice, Orpheus and Eurydice

Or·phe·us

 (ôr′fē-əs, -fyo͞os′)
n. Greek Mythology
A Thracian poet and musician whose music had the power to move even inanimate objects and who almost succeeded in rescuing his wife Eurydice from Hades.

[Latin Orpheus, from Greek; see orbh- in Indo-European roots.]

Or·phe′an (ôr-fē′ən, ôr′fē-ən) adj.

Orpheus

(ˈɔːfɪəs; -fjuːs)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a poet and lyre-player credited with the authorship of the poems forming the basis of Orphism. He married Eurydice and sought her in Hades after her death. He failed to win her back and was killed by a band of bacchantes

Or•phe•us

(ˈɔr fi əs, -fyus)

n.
a poet and lyre-player of Greek legend who tried to free his dead wife Eurydice from the underworld by charming the god Hades with his music.
Or•phe•an (ɔrˈfi ən, ˈɔr fi ən) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Orpheus - (Greek mythology) a great musicianOrpheus - (Greek mythology) a great musician; when his wife Eurydice died he went to Hades to get her back but failed
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
Translations
Orfeus
Orpheusz

Orpheus

[ˈɔːfɪuːs] NOrfeo

Orpheus

n (Myth) → Orpheus m

Orpheus

[ˈɔːfɪəs] nOrfeo
References in classic literature ?
Thus our heroe and the redeemed lady walked in the same manner as Orpheus and Eurydice marched heretofore; but though I cannot believe that Jones was designedly tempted by his fair one to look behind him, yet as she frequently wanted his assistance to help her over stiles, and had besides many trips and other accidents, he was often obliged to turn about.
And there were Castor and Pollux, the twin brothers, who were never accused of being chicken-hearted, although they had been hatched out of an egg; and Theseus, who was so renowned for killing the Minotaur, and Lynceus, with his wonderfully sharp eyes, which could see through a millstone, or look right down into the depths of the earth, and discover the treasures that were there; and Orpheus, the very best of harpers, who sang and played upon his lyre so sweetly, that the brute beasts stood upon their hind legs, and capered merrily to the music.
Daedalus is the base; Orpheus is the wall; Hermes is the edifice,--that is all.
For the most part I escaped wonderfully from these dangers, either by proceeding at once boldly and without deliberation to the goal, as is recommended to those who run the gauntlet, or by keeping my thoughts on high things, like Orpheus, who, "loudly singing the praises of the gods to his lyre, drowned the voices of the Sirens, and kept out of danger.
And they produce a host of books written by Musaeus and Orpheus, who were children of the Moon and the Muses--that is what they say-- according to which they perform their ritual, and persuade not only individuals, but whole cities, that expiations and atonements for sin may be made by sacrifices and amusements which fill a vacant hour, and are equally at the service of the living and the dead; the latter sort they call mysteries, and they redeem us from the pains of hell, but if we neglect them no one knows what awaits us.
From Pierus and the nymph Methone sprang Oeager; and from Oeager and Calliope Orpheus; from Orpheus, Dres; and from him, Eucles.
But the highest minds of the world have never ceased to explore the double meaning, or shall I say the quadruple or the centuple or much more manifold meaning, of every sensuous fact; Orpheus, Empedocles, Heraclitus, Plato, Plutarch, Dante, Swedenborg, and the masters of sculpture, picture, and poetry.
The scientific celebrities, forgetting their mollusks and glacial periods, gossiped about art, while devoting themselves to oysters and ices with characteristic energy; the young musician, who was charming the city like a second Orpheus, talked horses; and the specimen of the British nobility present happened to be the most ordinary man of the party.
how beautiful the music seemed to us both then - far, far more beautiful than the voice of Orpheus or the lute of Apollo, or anything of that sort could have sounded.
Sophie burned it all in the Orpheus and Eurydice grate, and kept her own counsel.
The power of music, the power of poetry, to unfix and as it were clap wings to solid nature, interprets the riddle of Orpheus.
Some are free rovers, doing a turn wherever they can get an opening, at the Obermann, the Orpheus, the Alcatraz, the Louvre, and so forth and so forth.