Orthodox Judaism


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Related to Orthodox Judaism: Conservative Judaism

Orthodox Judaism

n.
The branch of Judaism that is governed by adherence to the Torah as interpreted in the Talmud.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Orthodox Judaism

n
(Judaism) the form of Judaism characterized by allegiance to the traditional interpretation and to strict observance of the Mosaic Law as interpreted in the Talmud, etc, and regarded as divinely revealed. Compare Conservative Judaism, Reform Judaism
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Or′thodox Ju′daism


n.
a branch of Judaism that faithfully adheres to traditional beliefs and practices as evidenced by Torah study, daily synagogue attendance, and strict observance of the Sabbath, festivals, and dietary laws. Compare Conservative Judaism, Reform Judaism.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Orthodox Judaism - Jews who strictly observe the Mosaic law as interpreted in the Talmud
Hebraism, Jewish religion, Judaism - Jews collectively who practice a religion based on the Torah and the Talmud
Chasidim, Chassidim, Hasidim, Hasidism, Hassidim - a sect of Orthodox Jews that arose out of a pietistic movement originating in eastern Europe in the second half of the 18th century; a sect that follows the Mosaic law strictly
Haredi - any of several sects of Orthodox Judaism that reject modern secular culture and many of whom do not recognize the spiritual authority of the modern state of Israel
Orthodox Jew - Jew who practices strict observance of Mosaic law
2.Orthodox Judaism - beliefs and practices of a Judaic sect that strictly observes Mosaic law
Judaism - the monotheistic religion of the Jews having its spiritual and ethical principles embodied chiefly in the Torah and in the Talmud
Chasidism, Chassidism, Hassidism, Hasidism - beliefs and practices of a sect of Orthodox Jews
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Orthodox Judaism, homosexuality is not a matter of pride.
Hers is a story of dualities: of the appeal of belonging to a rigid religious community, and the feelings of isolation that come with it; of rejecting worldliness and being drawn toward the world; of steeping in notions of the end times and finding new life in Orthodox Judaism.
Now the NIF's embattled image is being weaponized in another conflict -- the ongoing battle by the right wing of the national-religious camp against groups that promote tolerance and pluralism in Orthodox Judaism.
He is regarded as a seminal figure by Modern Orthodox Judaism. With a number of Rabbi Joseph Soloveitchik's in-depth studies dealing with Passover, the Counting of the Omer, and Shavuot, "Rabbi Joseph B.
Nathan Steiger shares his story of losing his Mormon faith and, together with his wife and daughters, embracing Orthodox Judaism and converting as a family.
Jonathan Sarna and Zev Eleff, "The Immigration Clause that Transformed Orthodox Judaism in the United States," 101, no.
Tova Mirvis, a privileged 40-year-old woman--an acclaimed novelist, in fact --decides to give up the Orthodox Judaism in which she has been raised and leave her marriage with three children in order to become closer to her true self.
Yet curiously, Orthodox Judaism (which represents about 10 percent of the five to six million Jews in America) receives only fleeting mention in The Benedict Option itself.
(1) If you intend to act in accordance with the requirements of Orthodox Judaism, you ought to [phi].
The author takes a sociological approach to Orthodox Judaism in the US from the 19th century to the present, examining changes in religious law and proper Orthodox conduct, such as developments related to the status of women, in terms of the perspective of the community, rather than their effect on religious outlook and ritual behavior.
Blizek: In making the movie, what did you learn about the Kutin family's Orthodox Judaism?
But he's an Orthodox Jew and fewer than 10 percent of Jews in the United States relate to Orthodox Judaism.