kinesis

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Related to Orthokinesis: Klinokinesis

ki·ne·sis

 (kə-nē′sĭs, kī-)
n. pl. ki·ne·ses (-sēz)
Movement or activity of an organism in response to a stimulus such as light.

[Greek kīnēsis, movement, from kīnein, to move; see kei- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

kinesis

(kɪˈniːsɪs; kaɪ-)
n
(Biology) biology the nondirectional movement of an organism or cell in response to a stimulus, the rate of movement being dependent on the strength of the stimulus
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ki•ne•sis

(kɪˈni sɪs, kaɪ-)

n.
the movement of an organism in response to a stimulus, as light.
[1900–05; < Greek kinēsis movement]

-kinesis

a combining form with the meaning “movement, activity,” often used with the more particular senses “reaction to a stimulus” (photokinesis), “movement without an apparent physical cause” (telekinesis), “activity within a cell” (karyokinesis). Compare -kinesia.
[< Greek -kīnēsis; see kinesis]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.kinesis - a movement that is a response to a stimulus but is not oriented with respect to the source of stimulation
response, reaction - a bodily process occurring due to the effect of some antecedent stimulus or agent; "a bad reaction to the medicine"; "his responses have slowed with age"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
This search for a particular stimulus, which in this case is of an environmental nature, is known as orthokinesis (Atkins 1980).
The orientation component of light-induced swimming may passively result from non-directional changes in speed (orthokinesis) or turning rate (klinokinesis), the magnitude of which will vary in a light gradient.
The latter is much more common; it includes both orthokinesis (change in linear velocity) and klinokinesis (change in rate of turning, Fig 2c) and is based on adaptation mechanisms (Machemer and Teunis, 1996).