Osage


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O·sage

 (ō′sāj′, ō-sāj′)
n. pl. Osage or O·sag·es
1. A member of a Native American people formerly inhabiting western Missouri and later southeast Kansas, with a present-day population in north-central Oklahoma. Substantial oil reserves were discovered on Osage lands in the early 1900s.
2. The Siouan language of the Osage.

[French, from Osage wazházhe, ethnic self-designation.]

O′sage′ adj.

Osage

(əʊˈseɪdʒ; ˈəʊseɪdʒ)
npl Osages or Osage
1. (Peoples) a member of a North American Indian people formerly living in an area between the Missouri and Arkansas Rivers
2. (Languages) the language of this people, belonging to the Siouan family

O•sage

(ˈoʊ seɪdʒ, oʊˈseɪdʒ)

n., pl. O•sag•es, (esp. collectively) O•sage.
1. a member of an American Indian people originally of Missouri.
2. the Siouan language of the Osage.
3. a river flowing E from E Kansas to the Missouri River in central Missouri. 500 mi. (800 km) long.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Osage - a member of the Siouan people formerly living in Missouri in the valleys of the Missouri and Osage riversOsage - a member of the Siouan people formerly living in Missouri in the valleys of the Missouri and Osage rivers; oil was found on Osage lands early in the 20th century
Dhegiha - any member of a Siouan people speaking one of the Dhegiha languages
2.Osage - a river in Missouri that is a tributary of the Missouri RiverOsage - a river in Missouri that is a tributary of the Missouri River
Missouri, Show Me State, MO - a midwestern state in central United States; a border state during the American Civil War, Missouri was admitted to the Confederacy without actually seceding from the Union
3.Osage - the Dhegiha dialect spoken by the Osage
Dhegiha - a branch of the Siouan languages
References in classic literature ?
Departure from Fort Osage Modes of transportation Pack- horses Wagons Walker and Cerre; their characters Buoyant feelings on launching upon the prairies Wild equipments of the trappers Their gambols and antics Difference of character between the American and French trappers Agency of the Kansas General Clarke White Plume, the Kansas chief Night scene in a trader's camp Colloquy between White Plume and the captain Bee- hunters Their expeditions Their feuds with the Indians Bargaining talent of White Plume
IT WAS ON THE FIRST of May, 1832, that Captain Bonneville took his departure from the frontier post of Fort Osage, on the Missouri.
The Kansas resemble the Osages in features, dress, and language; they raise corn and hunt the buffalo, ranging the Kansas River, and its tributary streams; at the time of the captain's visit, they were at war with the Pawnees of the Nebraska, or Platte River.
He was accompanied by eight men as far as Fort Osage, about one hundred and fifty miles below Nodowa.
I have struck the Pawnees, the Konzas, the Omahaws, the Osages, and even the Long-knives.
At the STACK JVs option and upon the drilling and completion of two standard-lateral (4,500) horizontal wells targeting the Osage formation, the STACK JV will earn a 50% interest in approximately 6,000 net leasehold acres.
At the joint ventures option and upon the drilling and completion of two standard-lateral horizontal wells targeting the Osage formation, the STACK JV will earn a 50-percent interest in 6,000 net leasehold acres.
FOR MORE THAN a decade, members of the Osage Nation in Oklahoma were quietly, systematically slaughtered for their oil money.
The bold colorful design of the Osage cradleboard with its beadwork, yarnwork, ribbonwork, and bell accoutrements attract the eye like no other.
ONE COLD NOVEMBER day last year, Chris Turley, a 28-year-old member of the Osage Nation, set out from the tribe's northeast Oklahoma reservation upon a quest.
On one of the Osage cultural walks--the year a cold wind tore across the prairie and blew an arbor away, when Anita with her very-black hair and sly smile, who taught finger weaving, was still alive--I remember flinty Osage men in desert camo talking about hunting coyote.
According to the Osage American Indians, when May's full moon shines and the Earth warms, taller plants overtake April's tiny flowers, "stealing their light and water" until they die.