Osip Mandelstam


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Noun1.Osip Mandelstam - Russian poet who died in a prison camp (1891-1938)
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Los libros publicados por Igitur han sido ese lugar al que muchas veces hemos ido, con la sensacion del sediento que busca el manantial, para leer las grandes voces de la poesia del siglo XX, desde Giuseppe Ungaretti y Eugenio Montale hasta Osip Mandelstam y Philippe Jaccottet, desde Hermann Broch y Alexander Blok, hasta Wislawa Szymborska.
The volume that preceded Breathturn, Die Niemandsrose (Nobody's Rose, 1963), is generally made up of much longer poems, richer in texture and more literary in their allusions--a significant aspect of the collection is a dialogue with Osip Mandelstam, and Celan's French context--from 1948 he made his home in Paris--is also very apparent.
Osip Mandelstam (1891-1938) was perhaps Russian poetry's central figure in the twentieth century.
Suffice to say, that I remain, with Osip Mandelstam, uncertain of the
What I hanker for is a less straightforward portrait of any such dictator enlivened through taking into account the writers they tried to punish and obliterate, yet who managed to outlive them: Lenin's ascent to power through the fictions of Mikhail Bulgakov and Boris Pasternak; Stalin viewed from the poetry of Anna Akhmatova and Osip Mandelstam, who wrote a biting poem making fun of the despot's moustaches and ended his life in Siberia.
In the opening lines of narration in Ellie Ga's two-channel video installation Strophe, a Turning, 2017, the artist discusses Russian poet Osip Mandelstam's comparison, in a 1912 essay, between writing a poem and lobbing a bottled message into the sea.
Osip Mandelstam is faced with a similar question, as he wakes up one morning, sees a colorful flowery pattern before his eyes, and does not know how it got there.
In April 1934, the poet Osip Mandelstam bumped into Boris Pasternak on a Moscow street.
In his book, Wiman includes a few translations, according to Lund, of poems written by Russian poet Osip Mandelstam, known especially for the "The Stalin Epigram," which provoked his internment in a gulag prison camp where he eventually died.
often better at theology than theology is." So he fills his rambling notebook with lines from Emily Dickinson, Patrick Kavanagh, Rilke, Hopkins, Osip Mandelstam, D.H.
Flynn delves into the material borrowed from Maria Tsvetaeva and Osip Mandelstam in On Ballycastle Beach (1988) uncovered by Shane Alcobia-Murphy, pointing out that the source texts, rather than serving as some kind of secret code that explains the poem, actually highlight the folly of attempting to interpret a poem this way.