osmolal

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osmolal

(ɒzˈməʊləl)
adj
(Biochemistry) biochem relating to the concentration of a given solution
References in periodicals archive ?
Patients with recent history of ingesting toxic amounts of methanol and having osmolal gap of more than 10 mOsm/kg H2O were included.
This was supported by the evidence of a high plasma osmolal gap, which is the difference between the measured plasma osmolality in the laboratory and calculated plasma osmolality.
Laboratory testing and diagnosis of methanol and ethylene glycol are based on the presence of a high anion gap metabolic acidosis, presence of a serum osmolal gap (a difference between measured osmolality and calculated osmolality [greater than or equal to] 10), and measuring the levels of the toxic alcohols which is used for confirmation (typically these tests are not time sensitive, and treatment should not be withheld in any patient suspected of having toxic alcohol ingestion).
A 61-year-old man presented with an increased anion-gap metabolic acidosis, an increased serum osmolal gap, and a negative result in an alcohol screen.
The American Academy of Toxicology recommends treatment with ethanol (or fomepizole if available) in the presence of a methanol level >20 mg/dl, a documented history of methanol ingestion with a serum osmolal gap >10 mOsm/l or strong clinical suspicion of methanol poisoning with at least two of the following: arterial pH <7.3, serum HCO3 <20 mEq/l and osmolal gap >20 mOsm/[l.sup.2].
Ethylene glycol poisoning with a normal anion gap caused by concurrent ethanol ingestion: Importance of the osmolal gap. Am J Kidney Dis 1996; 27(1):130-133.
The serum osmolal gap (75 mOsm/kg) was calculated as follows: Osmolal gap = freezing-point depression osmometer value --(2 X [[Na.sup.+]] + [glucose]/18 + [blood urea nitrogen]/2.8 + [ethanol]/4.6), where the [Na.sup.+] concentration is in millimoles per liter and the glucose, blood urea nitrogen, and ethanol concentrations are in milligrams per deciliter.
AKA can also be associated with other laboratory abnormalities, such as increased serum lactate and an osmolal gap, as well as reduced electrolyte concentrations.