diuresis

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di·u·re·sis

 (dī′ə-rē′sĭs)
n.
Excessive discharge of urine.

[New Latin, from Late Latin diūrēticus, diuretic; see diuretic.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

diuresis

(ˌdaɪjʊˈriːsɪs)
n
(Pathology) excretion of an unusually large quantity of urine
[C17: from New Latin, from Greek diourein to urinate]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

di•u•re•sis

(ˌdaɪ əˈri sɪs)

n.
increased discharge of urine.
[1675–85; < New Latin < Greek diourē-, variant s. of dioureîn to pass in urine (di- di-3 + oureîn to urinate, derivative of oûron urine) + -sis -sis]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

diuresis

an abnormally heavy or increased discharge or flow of urine. — diuretic, n., adj.
See also: Bodily Functions
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

diuresis

An increased or excessive flow of urine.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diuresis - increased secretion of urine; if not due to increased liquid intake or to the action of a diuretic drug it can be a symptom of diabetes mellitus
symptom - (medicine) any sensation or change in bodily function that is experienced by a patient and is associated with a particular disease
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

di·u·re·sis

n. diuresis, aumento en la secreción de orina.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

diuresis

n diuresis f
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In diabetes mellitus, hyperglycemia causes glucose induced osmotic diuresis with resultant loss of body fluids and electrolytes.5 Several studies have estimated the electrolytes levels in diabetes mellitus in several countries and showed the association between electrolytes and hyperglycemia.5,6
The etiology for amputation is uncertain but may involve poor perfusion due to osmotic diuresis and lower blood pressure in compromised patients.
She likely developed a hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state, which led to an osmotic diuresis, and subsequent concomitant ketosis and lactic acidosis.
The inhibition of SGLT2 results in pronounced glucosuria with subsequent enhanced water excretion by osmotic diuresis [10].
As hyperglycemia-induced osmotic fluid and osmotic diuresis occur between compartments, electrolyte disturbances are expected resultant in patients with DKA.
The main aim of sodium administration either intravenously or via the oral route is to induce osmotic diuresis. Free water is excreted along with sodium via the kidneys as the renal handling of sodium is normal.
As in other trials of SGLT-2 inhibitors, canagliflozin significantly increased the risk of female and male genital mycotic infections (respective HR, 4.27 and 3.76) and was associated with osmotic diuresis (HR, 2.80), and volume depletion (HR, 1.44).
Increased urinary magnesium excretion due to hyperglycemia and osmotic diuresis may contribute to hypomagnesemia in diabetes18.
Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is caused by a decrease in the levels of circulating insulin, with associated increases in counter regulatory hormones (glucagon, catecholamine, cortisol, and growth hormone).3 Hyperglycaemia and acidosis subsequently result in osmotic diuresis, dehydration, and an obligate loss of electrolytes.
Osmotic diuresis was induced with 20% Mannitol, @ 10 ml/kg.
In this regard, osmotic diuresis emerges as a natural candidate to account for the findings.