osteoderm

(redirected from Osteoderms)

osteoderm

(ˈɒstɪəʊˌdɜːm)
n
(Zoology) the bony deposits found on the skin of many reptiles and a few mammals
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Limb bones: thirty-four osteoderms (ROM-4057240599, 40620, 40600-40604 and 42190); one podial bone (ROM-40620).
The scientists found parts of its skull, lower jaw, neck and back vertebrae, ribs, shoulder and forelimb, back foot and osteoderms, which were enough to help us draw the imaginative image of the dinosaur and help us to know its genus.
Like many titanosaurs, Mansourasaurus boasted bony plates called osteoderms embedded in its skin.
It had large nostrils and elaborate ornamentation across the snout," which helped identify the species as different from previously known members of the group, all of which had bony spikes, called osteoderms.
However, none of these studies mentioned what type of bone remains allowed the identification of the species listed above, except Quintela and Gatti (2009) that reported the presence of osteoderms of armadillos in the feces analyzed.
Goniopholidids are one of the most common taxa of the crocodylomorph European Mesozoic fossil record (Buscalioni et al., 2013) and teeth and osteoderms are dominant remains in fossil assemblages (Schwarz, 2002; Salisbury and Naish, 2011).
The holotype of Scoloparia glyphanodon (NSM996GF83.1) has a 'nuchal shield' composed of small, polygonal osteoderms, but no other known specimen preserves this distinctive feature (Sues and Baird 1998).
Stegosaurus was covered in osteoderms, which are bony deposits on the skin that acted as armor.
According to a team of researchers from the University of Guelph, the study of two sauropod dinosaurs, an adult and a juvenile, from Madagascar, suggested that these long-necked plant-eaters used hollow "skin bones" called osteoderms to store minerals needed to maintain their huge skeletons and to lay large egg clutches.
Smaller, relatively elongate and irregular coprolitic masses are of more typical crocodylian fecal morphology and may come from Borealosuchus sp., also represented by bones, teeth, and osteoderms in the fossil assemblage.