Herero

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He·re·ro

 (hə-râr′ō, hĕr′ə-rō′)
n. pl. Herero or He·re·ros
1. A member of a pastoral people inhabiting Namibia and Botswana.
2. The Bantu language of this people.

Herero

(həˈrɛərəʊ; ˈhɛərəˌrəʊ)
npl -ro or -ros
1. (Peoples) a member of a formerly rich cattle-keeping Negroid people of southern Africa, living chiefly in central Namibia
2. (Languages) the language of this people, belonging to the Bantu group of the Niger-Congo family
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Herero - a member of a pastoral Bantu people living in Namibia, Botswana, and Angola
Namibia, Republic of Namibia, South West Africa - a republic in southwestern Africa on the south Atlantic coast (formerly called South West Africa); achieved independence from South Africa in 1990; the greater part of Namibia forms part of the high Namibian plateau of South Africa
Angola, Republic of Angola - a republic in southwestern Africa on the Atlantic Ocean; achieved independence from Portugal in 1975 and was the scene of civil war until 1990
Botswana, Republic of Botswana - a landlocked republic in south-central Africa that became independent from British control in the 1960s
Bantu - a member of any of a large number of linguistically related peoples of Central and South Africa
2.Herero - a Banto language spoken by the Herero in Namibia, Botswana, and Angola
Bantoid language, Bantu - a family of languages widely spoken in the southern half of the African continent
References in periodicals archive ?
The founder of the project, Christien Roos of Groningen in the Netherlands, called it 'Penduka' after a common greeting in the Otjiherero and Oshiwambo languages in Namibia.
The national television also broadcasts news bulletins on specific days for specific languages, which include Khoekhoegowab, seTswana, siLozi, otjiHerero and oshiWambo (L.
A total of 2 600 booklets of the 54 page book in local languages Oshindonga, Rukwangali, Otjiherero and Afrikaans were printed in acknowledging the use of traditional knowledge and wisdom through methods such as combined herding of livestock.
Languages of the study group (N=100) Mother's Home Able to Able to Able to language * language understand speak read/write n n n n n Oshiwambo 27 24 36 34 23 Otjiherero 23 23 41 38 12 Afrikaans 16 17 67 67 49 Damara 12 11 20 19 8 Nama 11 11 11 11 4 Himba 3 3 3 3 0 Nyemba 3 3 3 2 2 Portuguese 2 2 3 3 2 Rukwangali 2 1 4 2 1 Shilozi 2 2 3 3 3 Dhcniba 1 1 1 1 0 English 1 1 50 50 40 Mbukushu 1 1 1 1 1 Sifwe 1 1 1 1 1 German 0 0 5 5 0 * Some subjects had a mother who spoke more than one language.
Kavari and Marten (2009), for example, analyze multiple noun class prefixes in Otjiherero, where they occur in the case of diminutive, augmentative and locative marking as well as with some kinds of plural formation.
Moreover, most people live in either Katutura ('the place where we do not live', at the time intended for Oshivambo speakers) or in Otuzemba ('the place that smells like shit'), in the apartheid cityscape intended for Otjiherero speakers.
The name in the local Otjiherero language means 'bitter milk', as the cattle used to graze on a bush that turned their milk bitter.
Given that most Yanks can't even find Namibia on a map (hint: just north of South Africa); that neither Lumbly nor Glover are major names for young African-American viewers; that a good portion of the dialogue is in Afrikaans, Oshiwambo, OtjiHerero and German; and that pic clocks in at an interminable two hours and 41 minutes, "Namibia" will strikemost potential distribs as commercially toxic.
The elections resulted in SWAPO controlling the majority of all three categories of local authority, except in the south and rural OtjiHerero and Damara-speaking regions northeast and northwest of Windhoek respectively, where the Democratic Turnhalle Alliance (DTA) and/or United Democratic Front (UDF) performed well (Table 2).