otoliths

(redirected from Otoconia)
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Related to Otoconia: Epley maneuver

otoliths

Tiny calcium carbonate crystals in the inner ear. See vestibular system.
References in periodicals archive ?
The investigators speculate that the otopetrins maintain the pH appropriate for formation of otoconia and that the defect in the tlt mice is due to a dysregulation of pH.
Although the pathophysiological process of the disease has not been fully clarified, currently, the widely accepted opinion is that the disease results from the accumulation of otoconia that are detached from the utricular macula in the semicircular canals and thereby sensitizing such canals to gravity (1).
It's thought that BPPV is caused by the movement of small naturally occurring crystals called otoconia from one part of the inner ear to another--once relocated, they interfere with tiny hairs in the inner ear that affect balance.
Furthermore, it is assumed that estrogen induces vascular supply to the macula and otoconia due to varied glucose and lipid metabolism (1).
Several maneuvers are in use for treatment of BPPV, which aim at replacing the displaced otoconia to the utricle1.
Benign positional vertigo (BPV) is a common and correctable cause of episodic vertigo triggered by otoconia dislodged from the otolith membranes of the utricle into the semicircular canals.
Andrew Clements explains: "It's caused when debris from otoconia crystals (part of the mechanism by which we balance and sense gravity) fall into the wrong part of the ear.
Andrew Clements said: "It's caused when debris from otoconia crystals (part of the mechanism by which we balance and sense gravity) fall into the wrong part of the ear.
It occurs when otoconia that are normally embedded in gel in the utricle become dislodged and migrate into the 3 fluid-filled semicircular canals, where they interfere with the normal fluid movement these canals use to sense head motion, causing the inner ear to send false signals to the brain.
BPPV is often accompained with nausea, vomiting, (27) and is usually caused by dislodged otoconia in the posterior semicircular canal.
In vertebrates, this organ is called an otocyst with an otolith or otoconia (Budelmann, 1988).
Displacement of otoconia from utricle to semicircular canals is held responsible for the development of BPPV.