otoliths

(redirected from Otoconia)
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Related to Otoconia: Epley maneuver

otoliths

Tiny calcium carbonate crystals in the inner ear. See vestibular system.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The possible pathophysiology of developing BPPV after ECT is related to the electrical stimulation, which may be sufficient to detach the otoconia into the labyrinth and cause canalolithiasis.
If substantial advances have been made in the pathology of otoconia (VBPP and canal vestibulopathies); however, when reading or listening to speakers nowadays, I am struck by the lack of intellectual honesty in their communications.
According to the widely accepted theory (canalithiasis), otoconia dislodged from the utricular or saccular macula subsequently move into the semicircular canal (SCC) and cause an endolymph displacement that stimulates the cupula of the SCC (4).
This is mostly due to the displacement of otoconia into the SCC, most commonly the posterior SCC.
In the vestibular system, Otop1 is necessary for the formation and function of structures called otoconia, which are calcium carbonate crystals that sense gravity and acceleration.
BPPV is caused by free otoconia dislodged from the utricular macula that have entered the semicircular canal, where they provoke an inappropriate flow of endolymph whenever the head is rotated in the plane of the affected canal [15].
A significant increase in the amplitude on the affected side occurred after repositioning procedure at oVEMP points to the return of detached otoconia just in the area of utricle.
Although the pathophysiological process of the disease has not been fully clarified, currently, the widely accepted opinion is that the disease results from the accumulation of otoconia that are detached from the utricular macula in the semicircular canals and thereby sensitizing such canals to gravity (1).
It's thought that BPPV is caused by the movement of small naturally occurring crystals called otoconia from one part of the inner ear to another--once relocated, they interfere with tiny hairs in the inner ear that affect balance.
Several maneuvers are in use for treatment of BPPV, which aim at replacing the displaced otoconia to the utricle1.
MD also predisposes to BPPV [75], eventually from inner ear injury with detachment of otoconia [71, 76].
Benign positional vertigo (BPV) is a common and correctable cause of episodic vertigo triggered by otoconia dislodged from the otolith membranes of the utricle into the semicircular canals.