Porte

(redirected from Ottoman Porte)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

Porte

 (pôrt)
n.
The government of the Ottoman Empire.

[French, short for la Sublime Porte, the High Gate (the main gate of the palace complex of the Ottoman sultan in Istanbul), the Porte : sublime, sublime + porte, gate (from Old French; see port3) (translation of Ottoman Turkish Bāb-ı 'ālī : Arabic bāb, gate + Persian -i, suffix connecting a noun to its qualifier + Arabic 'ālī, high).]

Porte

(pɔːt)
n
(Historical Terms) Also called: Sublime Porte the court or government of the Ottoman Empire
[C17: shortened from French Sublime Porte High Gate, rendering the Turkish title Babi Ali, the imperial gate, which was regarded as the seat of government]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Porte - the Ottoman court in ConstantinoplePorte - the Ottoman court in Constantinople
royal court, court - the sovereign and his advisers who are the governing power of a state
References in periodicals archive ?
Until the late 6th century, the Romanian language borrowed very few words of Turkish origin, the Ottoman Porte exercising during this period only political domination by "collecting and sending the tribute, gifts in kind and supplies of war", by "courtesy calls of gentlemen and landowners to the Porte", by "sending hostages".
Khmelnytsky, over this period of less than three years, attempted first to consolidate an alternative alliance with Sweden, then to undermine negotiations between Muscovy and the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, and finally to create new alliances for Ukraine--with Sweden again, with Transylvania, and negotiations with the Ottoman Porte.
Characteristic of this transitional stage were the Considerations on the Truly Critical State of the Ottoman Porte by Eugenios Voulgaris ("Bulgari" in Russian), a Greek scholar and educator invited to Russia by Catherine II.
31) In the 1700s the active economic relationship between Western governments and the Ottoman Porte were a determinative influence in the acknowledgement of Ottoman sovereignty over the Greek people.
The book concludes with a brief epilogue, entitled What abut the Women, Then, that begins with a quote from Lady Mary Wortley Montague, wife of the British ambassador to the Ottoman Porte in the early eighteenth century.
In 1575, shortly before the queen authorized the formation of the English Levant Company, the Ottoman Porte "granted Edward Osborne and Richard Staper permission to trade in its domains, and three years later William Harborne settled in Istanbul as their envoy" (195).
Early in the nineteenth century, Lord Elgin, British Ambassador to the Ottoman Porte, took the lion's share of the Parthenon sculptures and transferred them for safe-keeping to London.