Ottoman Turkish


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Ottoman Turkish

n.
The form of the Turkish language used as the administrative and literary language of the Ottoman Empire, containing extensive borrowings from Arabic and Persian and written in Arabic script.
References in periodicals archive ?
Turkey's state-run Anadolu newspaper reported Saturday that Turkey planned to rename the street where the UAE Embassy is located in Ankara after Fakhreddin Pasha, the commander of the Ottoman Turkish troops at Medina in 1916.
Holcomb issued a powerful proclamation memorializing the Ottoman Turkish Empires centrally-planned and executed annihilation of close to three million Armenians, Greeks, Assyrians and Syriacs, making the Hoosier State the 48th U.
1 million population -- a legacy of almost 500 years of Ottoman Turkish rule that ended in the late 19th century.
Flynn describes the first attempts in the multi-pronged but mainly independent sending of western Christian missionaries into the Russian-dominated Caucasus and the lands of imperial Persia, which lay beyond the familiar and accessible Ottoman Turkish dominions in the 18th and 19th centuries.
On March 3, which marks Bulgaria's liberation from 500 years of Ottoman Turkish rule, an American staff member recited from the poem commemorating the victorious Bulgarian struggle, "Volunteers at Shipka.
The term was introduced to Europe via the Ottoman Turkish kahve which, in turn, was derived from the Arabic qahweh.
TEHRAN (FNA)- The German parliament withstood a barrage of pressure from the Turkish government, approving a symbolic resolution that declares the 1915 massacre of Armenians by Ottoman Turkish forces a 'genocide'.
Despite the campaign's failure against Ottoman Turkish forces, with the loss of more than 11,000 ANZAC lives, it has come to be viewed as a formative moment of national identity in both Australia and New Zealand, and is now a day of remembrance for military dead from both nations in all subsequent conflicts.
ANKARA, April 1 (KUNA) -- The National Library of Turkey (Milli Kutuphane) hosts a rare invaluable collection of old Arab, Persian, Ottoman Turkish and African manuscripts.
A wide range of sources are culled together: archival sources in Cairo, Damascus, Istanbul, and Washington (the US government's analysis of Japan's relationship with Muslims in the Middle East during World War II); Arabic and Ottoman Turkish newspapers and journals; a variety of memoirs, papers, and diaries as well as secondary sources.
Surviving the Forgotten Armenian Genocide is the true-life, primary testimony of a man who survived the genocide that the Ottoman Turkish government enacted against its Armenian Christian subjects during World War One.
It was named Cevahir Bedestan ('Bedesten of Gems') and was also known as Bezzazistan-y Cedid ('New Bedesten') in Ottoman Turkish.