Ottoman Turkish


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Ottoman Turkish

n.
The form of the Turkish language used as the administrative and literary language of the Ottoman Empire, containing extensive borrowings from Arabic and Persian and written in Arabic script.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lalezar restaurant offers exotic middle eastern fare inspired from Ottoman Turkish culinary tradition, including hot and cold mezzes, succulent grilled meats, kebabs and koftas.
From 1570 to 1878 under Ottoman Turkish rule Greek Cypriots enjoying certain autonomy as long as they paid their taxes.
The haul is thought to have been buried in the 19th century, and includes 7,046 Ottoman Turkish silver coins called akces.
Erdogan is presently toying with the idea of reinstituting Ottoman Turkish at state-run schools, and has modified the Turkish national anthem, which is now played on brass instruments, making it sound "Ottoman".
Lawrence pioneered tactics of unconventional warfare as he and the British Military Mission fought the Hedgehog mission alongside Arab forces against the Ottoman Turkish army, in the Hejaz region during the Arab Revolt of the WWI period.
The word baklava entered the English language in 1650, a borrowing from Ottoman Turkish. Turkish historians claim of its Turkish origin whereas some say "baklava" may come from the Mongolian word "bayla" meaning to tie or wrap up.
Turkey's state-run Anadolu newspaper reported Saturday that Turkey planned to rename the street where the UAE Embassy is located in Ankara after Fakhreddin Pasha, the commander of the Ottoman Turkish troops at Medina in 1916.
Holcomb issued a powerful proclamation memorializing the Ottoman Turkish Empires centrally-planned and executed annihilation of close to three million Armenians, Greeks, Assyrians and Syriacs, making the Hoosier State the 48th U.S.
Bulgaria has one of the biggest Muslim communities in Europe at about 12 percent of its 7.1 million population -- a legacy of almost 500 years of Ottoman Turkish rule that ended in the late 19th century.
It is the first dedicated to the saint, who was born to Albanian parents in what was then the Ottoman Turkish province of Kosovo.
On March 3, which marks Bulgaria's liberation from 500 years of Ottoman Turkish rule, an American staff member recited from the poem commemorating the victorious Bulgarian struggle, "Volunteers at Shipka." There were also traditional Bulgarian dancing and songs, and FSN-made Bulgarian dishes, such as "banitsa," a pastry with cheese.
The term was introduced to Europe via the Ottoman Turkish kahve which, in turn, was derived from the Arabic qahweh.