Holy Roman Empire

(redirected from Ottonian empire)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

Holy Roman Empire

A loosely federated central European political entity that began with the coronation of the German king Otto I as the first emperor in 962. The empire was long troubled, first by the conflict between papal and civil authority and later by religious strife and political fragmentation, and after the 1200s the emperors had little power in most of its constituent states. Upon Francis II's renunciation of his title at Napoleon's instigation in 1806, the empire ceased to exist.

Holy Roman Empire

n
(Historical Terms) the complex of European territories under the rule of the Frankish or German king who bore the title of Roman emperor, beginning with the coronation of Charlemagne in 800 ad. The last emperor, Francis II, relinquished his crown in 1806

Ho′ly Ro′man Em′pire


n.
a Germanic empire located chiefly in central Europe, considered as beginning with the coronation of Charlemagne in a.d. 800 or of Otto the Great in a.d. 962 and lasting until the renunciation of the crown by Francis II in 1806.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Holy Roman Empire - a political entity in Europe that began with the papal coronation of Otto I as the first emperor in 962 and lasted until 1806 when it was dissolved by NapoleonHoly Roman Empire - a political entity in Europe that began with the papal coronation of Otto I as the first emperor in 962 and lasted until 1806 when it was dissolved by Napoleon
political entity, political unit - a unit with political responsibilities
Europe - the 2nd smallest continent (actually a vast peninsula of Eurasia); the British use `Europe' to refer to all of the continent except the British Isles
References in periodicals archive ?
Topics that receive the attention of more than one essay include Archbishop Wulfstan, Ademar of Chabannes, apocalyptic attitudes in the Ottonian Empire, and the millennium's influence on religious thought.
Johanna Maria van Winters essay, "The Education of the Daughters of the Nobility in the Ottonian Empire also has little to do with Theophano.
In her address, Professor Herrin demonstrated how marriage was a key element in the imperial policies of Byzantium, Tang China, Europe's Carolingian and Ottonian empires, and the Ottoman Empire.