Ouida


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Oui·da

 (wē′də)
See Marie Louise de la Ramée.

Ouida

(ˈwiːdə)
n
(Biography) real name Marie Louise de la Ramée. 1839–1908, British popular novelist, best known for Under Two Flags (1867)
References in classic literature ?
In an unclouded harmony of tastes and interests they cultivated ferns in Wardian cases, made macrame lace and wool embroidery on linen, collected American revolutionary glazed ware, subscribed to "Good Words," and read Ouida's novels for the sake of the Italian atmosphere.
One was the life of Garfield; the second, Paul du Chaillu's African travels; the third, a novel by Ouida with the last forty pages missing; and the fourth, Irving's "Alhambra." This last had been lent me by a school-teacher.
'Ouida's' are my delight, only they are so long, I get worn out before I 'm through."
Indeed, in her later critiques of novelists including Braddon and Ouida, it is not the criminality of their female characters to which Oliphant objects but, instead, the overt and pulsating articulation of the heroine's fleshly desires.
Mississippi Democratic Party spokeswoman Ouida Meruvia criticized Bryant and Christie.
favourable views of expatriate English writers like Ouida and Vernon
A stone was erected where Ouida and Basil Rathbones' black German shepherd, Moritz, is buried in the Bartlett pet cemetery behind the family's home in Oxford.
McBride - Ouida McBride, 97, of Springfield, died July 13.
Eternal editor Ouida Cox, who has led the magazine for decades, said that the change had been in the works for some time, but recently the magazine began using a new printer, QuadGraphics, which is headquartered in Sussex, Wis., and has a plant in Jonesboro.
However, by 1895 Pall Mall was reliant on popular writers like Haggard, Ouida, and Grant Allen for contributions, and Rutenberg notes that in 1894-95 few prominent literary or political figures were featured "as the editorial thrust of the periodical seemed to shift" (Rutenberg 307).
Ouida the phenomenon; evolving social, political, and gender concerns in her fiction.
Confirming Wright's version of the collaboration, Ouida Campbell, who served as the writers' secretarial support during their collaboration in Chapel Hill, reported in an article she wrote for the university's Carolina Magazine that both writers would on occasion dictate dialogue.