outcrossing

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out·cross

 (out′krôs′, -krŏs′)
v. out·crossed, out·cross·ing, out·cross·es
v.tr.
1. To mate (an animal) to an unrelated individual of the same species or breed.
2. To pollinate (a plant) with pollen from a different plant of the same species, often one that is unrelated or is of a different variety.
v.intr.
To outcross a plant or animal.
n.
1. The process of outcrossing.
2. Offspring produced by outcrossing.

outcrossing

(ˈaʊtˌkrɒsɪŋ)
n
(Biology) the act of mating unrelated individuals
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References in periodicals archive ?
0,T) is the number of out-crossings in the time interval [0,T], Ditlevsen and Madsen [6] have shown that the mean number of out-crossings can be found by integrating the out-crossing rate over the period of interest, i.
Consequently if Bt and non-Bt plants grown in close proximity then out-crossing occurs and results in Bt gene transfer to seeds of non-Bt refuge bolls (Zhang et al.
But the Agrobacterium containing the genes could get into an out-crossing plant, which then might spread.
The plant species that result from out-crossing maintain the majority of their distributed genetic variability within the population, in contrast to a predominantly self-pollinated species in which the majority of the genetic variability is distributed between populations (Hamrick & Godt 1989).
In researching the records, I found only two putative cases of out-crossing of the bufflehead in the 20th century, but I found 12 cases in the last decade, most of it posted online through birders' networks, along with good photographs showing the strange combination of features.
Rice is self-pollinating, so out-crossing - interbreeding with other rice varieties - is virtually impossible.
The report advised against grandparent to grandchild mating and said that out-crossing must not be ruled out.
Mrs Kisko said the Kennel Club was "dedicated to improving the health of all dogs" and had "encouraged out-crossing in certain breeds for more than a decade".
ABSTRACT Because the accumulation of inbreeding within hatchery-propagated stocks of the hard clam, Mercenaria mercenaria (Linnaeus, 1758), could result in reduced growth and survival, we studied the potential for improving performance through out-crossing among existing hatchery strains.
Do existing testing safeguards adequately address the problem of out-crossing of genetically engineered creeping bentgrass pollen?
There is also the risk of contaminating local seed, or out-crossing as it is called in scientific circles.