References in classic literature ?
The outcasts with whom he had remained, reflecting that, after all, it was the best company in Paris,--the outcasts had continued to interest themselves in behalf of the gypsy.
Conceived in the same mood which produced "Almayer's Folly" and "An Outcast of the Islands," it is told in the same breath (with what was left of it, that is, after the end of "An Outcast"), seen with the same vision, rendered in the same method--if such a thing as method did exist then in my conscious relation to this new adventure of writing for print.
I gather the larkspur Over the hillside, Blown mid the chaos Of boulder and bellbine; Hating the tyrant Who made me an outcast, Who of his leisure Now spares me no moment: Drinking the mountain spring, Shading at noon-day Under the cypress My limbs from the sun glare.
I-- I have brought you to this pass, for I have become an outcast, my darling.
He found himself an outcast in the midst of the populous camp.
I write it with the tears in my eyes -- you shall not link your fate to an outcast.
The outcast seized on the bread and meat with lean, long-nailed hands that looked like claws.
Aye, for the game of creating, my brethren, there is needed a holy Yea unto life: ITS OWN will, willeth now the spirit; HIS OWN world winneth the world's outcast.
Knowing what this poor fallen man had once been, her whole soul was moved by the shuddering terror with which he had appealed to her -- the outcast woman -- for support against his instinctively discovered enemy.
He was ruined past hope now; his destruction would be immediate and sure, and he would be an outcast and friendless.
Go on, my dear friend, till you, and those who, like you, have been saved, so as by fire, from the dark prison- house, shall stereotype these free, illegal pulses into statutes; and New England, cutting loose from a blood-stained Union, shall glory in being the house of refuge for the oppressed,--till we no longer merely "~hide~ the outcast," or make a merit of standing idly by while he is hunted in our midst; but, consecrat- ing anew the soil of the Pilgrims as an asylum for the oppressed, proclaim our WELCOME to the slave so loudly, that the tones shall reach every hut in the Carolinas, and make the broken-hearted bondman leap up at the thought of old Massachusetts.
Why am I here now, an outcast from civilisation, instead of being a happy man enjoying all the pleasures of London?