overbite

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Related to Overbites: Underbites

o·ver·bite

 (ō′vər-bīt′)
n.
A malocclusion of the teeth in which the front upper incisor and canine teeth project over the lower.

overbite

(ˈəʊvəˌbaɪt)
n
(Dentistry) dentistry an extension of the upper front teeth over the lower front teeth when the mouth is closed. Also called: vertical overlap

o•ver•bite

(ˈoʊ vərˌbaɪt)

n.
occlusion in which the upper incisor teeth overlap the lower ones.
[1885–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.overbite - (dentistry) malocclusion in which the upper teeth extend abnormally far over the lower teethoverbite - (dentistry) malocclusion in which the upper teeth extend abnormally far over the lower teeth
dental medicine, dentistry, odontology - the branch of medicine dealing with the anatomy and development and diseases of the teeth
malocclusion - (dentistry) a condition in which the opposing teeth do not mesh normally
Translations

o·ver·bite

n. sobremordida.

overbite

n sobremordida
References in periodicals archive ?
Previously only ever thought of for their comedy value as the Jimmy Edwards of the animal kingdom, Blue Planet II (the programme's title was the only unimaginative thing about it) showed the harshness of life amidst the melting polar ice caps for these whiskery beasts whose overbites would make even Ken Dodd blush.
Walk into just about any middle school and you're likely to see at least some students wearing braces to correct their overbites or crooked teeth.
Braces often are a rite of passage for middle-school students with overbites or crooked teeth, but the oral problems those braces are solving likely started way back in elementary school--possibly as early as first or second grade.
Braces can correct crooked or crowded teeth, overbites and under-bites, incorrect jaw position or jaw joint disorders," Dr Abdulmueen al-Qahtani said, adding: "If left untreated, these problems can result in tooth decay, gum disease, headaches and earaches, as well as speaking, biting or chewing problems.
It was reported that children with deep dental overbites were at a significantly increased risk for developing eustachian tube dysfunction [McDonnell et al.
They do not address patients with Class II or III malocclusions, or Class I malocclusions with complications involving severe crowding or extraction of teeth, excessive generalized spacing, severe open bites, deep overbites, or crossbites.