overinform

overinform

(ˌəʊvərɪnˈfɔːm)
vb (tr)
to animate or inform excessively
References in periodicals archive ?
Goman advises communicators to give employees honest, no-nonsense information; release bad news and treat employees as thoughtful, intelligent adults; put messages into context -- don't just say what, say why, how and where; build as much interaction as practical into communication; combine new communication technologies with face-to-face, lectures and printed matter; make sure key messages are delivered by the people who are closest to the targeted recipients; try not to overinform or underinform; and remember that behavior speaks louder than words.
Management seeks opportunities to innovate and goes so far as to "overinform" employees with the sharing of information.
All of this may make (in one restricted sense) perfectly good sense, but because of the indiscriminacy and exoticism of the details, it leaves a viewer/reader hopelessly overinformed (if informed is the right word)., and uncomfortably aware of that fact.
Yet if one rejects overinformed second-guessing with respect to private actors, there are again parallels for government actors.
From the fact that a homodiegetic narrator addresses and overinforms a particular narratee, readers will indeed deduce more readily a psychological profile.
Of course inaction was itself a decision, but she knew that if anything, Singleton had been overinformed about what would happen if he continued on the drugs.
Fixated on the specific horrors about which we are thoroughly informed, if not overinformed, we have adopted a pessimistic, and to a certain extent hysterical, stance.