overplus


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal.

o·ver·plus

 (ō′vər-plŭs′)
n.
An amount in excess of need; a surplus.

overplus

(ˈəʊvəˌplʌs)
n
surplus or excess quantity

o•ver•plus

(ˈoʊ vərˌplʌs)

n.
[1350–1400]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.overplus - extreme excessoverplus - extreme excess; "an embarrassment of riches"
excessiveness, inordinateness, excess - immoderation as a consequence of going beyond sufficient or permitted limits
redundance, redundancy - the attribute of being superfluous and unneeded; "the use of industrial robots created redundancy among workers"
References in classic literature ?
Well, then, in throwing out this overplus of ballast at a given moment, I am certain to rise with great rapidity."
1 pound, 17s, 9d, amount of overplus, as shown in receipted account herewith.
Then Robin turned to Sir Richard of the Lea, and quoth he, "Now, Sir Richard, the church seemed like to despoil thee, therefore some of the overplus of church gains may well be used in aiding thee.
I was never so nauseated in my life with overplus of fallacy.
Whoever hath her wish, thou hast thy Will, And Will to boot, and Will in overplus; So thou being rich in Will add to thy Will One will of mine to make thy large Will more.
[...] to that matured freedom of the spirit which is, in an equal degree, self mastery and discipline of the heart, and gives access to the path of much and various reflection--to that inner comprehensiveness and self satisfaction of over-richness which precludes all danger that the spirit has gone astray even in its own path and is sitting intoxicated in some corner or other; to that overplus of plastic, healing, imitative and restorative power which is the very sign of vigorous health, that overplus which confers upon the free spirit the perilous prerogative of spending a life in experiment and of running adventurous risks: the past-master-privilege of the free spirit (2008: 7).
Previous literatures have demonstrated that the oxidative stress, induced by overplus of reaction oxygen species (ROS), can attack the cell membrane, nucleic acid, protein, enzymes, and other biomacromolecules by peroxidation, leading to many severe cellular and tissular damage contributing to the dysregulation of redox-sensitive signaling pathways and accelerating the progress of aging [7].
TO MY MIND, MARILYNNE ROBINSON'S three novels bear all these marks in plus and overplus. As in real, ordinary life, nothing much happens in these books, but that unspectacular little shimmers with significance, which the simple language in its colloquial American beauty conveys with piercing accuracy.
And the overplus of the money, that shall remain to me, shall make me more studious, to correct the said new Testament, and so newly to imprint the same once again (10) Like any other type of printing, to produce an evangelical book abroad required money to cover the costs of the initial printing as well as some hope of recovering those costs through sales.
how much victuals the city with the whole country or shire round about it doth spend," relates Hythloday, "yet they sew much more corn and breed up much more cattle than serveth for their own use, parting the overplus among their borderers" (More 1999, 52).
Until the 1750s, the typical practice was for the posts to offer fewer trade goods than prescribed under the official standard, creating what was known as an "overplus." The more competition a post faced for its trade, the smaller the typical overplus became.
Consciousness, then, is a kind of overplus of mental meaning, an excessive superfluity.