overread

overread

(ˌəʊvəˈriːd)
vb (tr) , -reads, -reading or -read
to read over or reread
adj
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (of a book) read too much
2. (Education) (of a person) excessively educated
References in periodicals archive ?
overread to create a narrower sense--e.g., birds can fly--than is
But most vehicles tested as part of a survey by Auto Express had perfectly accurate speedometers, and those that didn't only overread by around 3mph.
There is ample praise for American law in Nazi writings, but Whitman does not overread his sources.
In declining to scrutinize pastspeech evidence with care, lower courts have both overread key Supreme Court precedents and undervalued the free-speech interests these cases present.
24 ("As for the 'hundreds of judges' who have relied on the view of the Second Amendment Justice Stevens claims we endorsed in Miller: If so, they overread Miller.
Artist as Reporter ends with Hill wondering if he has overread PM's intentions through a Greenbergian lens in crediting its essential concern with the elements of its particular medium:
Circuit's 1990 opinion in Baker Hughes thus overread General Dynamics on this point.
For regulators not accustomed to the distinction between deferral and exclusion provisions, it would have been easy to overread the statute as implying a permanent exclusion rather than as merely being silent on the question of permanent exclusion versus deferral.
Of course this is to overread the natural history passage, but my purpose in thus misreading it is to illustrate that for Marianne Moore two aspects of composition, counting syllables and reading prose, are inextricably conjoined, and that the product of their marriage is not just verse that sounds prosy because the ear accustomed to accentual rhythms is deaf to units measured by syllable count, but prose whose constituents come to its surface and, in forming a diversion from what the writing says, participate in the revived materiality that animates poetic language.
Noting that it was "important not to overread Clapper," the Remijas court distinguished the Supreme Court case by stating that "Clapper was addressing speculative harm based on something that may not even have happened to some or all of the plaintiffs," whereas the Neiman Marcus customers definitely knew of the increased risk, because Neiman Marcus itself had alerted them to the cyberattack.
We think these cases have been sorely overread. The claim that magistrate judges' lack of contempt authority has constitutional significance appears at best to be a case of misguided reverse-engineering.
2014) (Hamilton & Posner, JJ.) (quoting skeptical views from Judge Easterbrook and Justice Jackson when urging that "judges and lawyers must take care not to 'overread' what dictionaries tell us"); United States v.