Ovis canadensis


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Noun1.Ovis canadensis - wild sheep of mountainous regions of western North America having massive curled hornsOvis canadensis - wild sheep of mountainous regions of western North America having massive curled horns
genus Ovis, Ovis - sheep
mountain sheep - any wild sheep inhabiting mountainous regions
References in periodicals archive ?
Determination of steroid hormones in wild bighorn sheep feces cimarron (Ovis canadensis Shaw) in Baja California Mexico
Prior to the arrival of European Americans to western North America, Bighorn Sheep (Ovis canadensis) were abundant in most mountain ranges and "badlands" along major rivers and principal tributaries from their easternmost range in the Pine Ridge region of South Dakota to the westernmost regions of North America (Buechner 1960).
Since then, it has most frequently been identified in healthy and diseased domestic sheep, domestic goats (Capra aegagrus hircus), and bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis).
Predation of bighorn sheep, Ovis canadensis (Artiodactila: Bovidae) and mule deer, Odocoileus hemionus (Artiodactila: Cervidae) by Puma concolor (Carnivora: Felidae) in Coahuila, Mexico
SEASONAL VARIATION OF THE NUTRITIONAL CONTENT IN THE DIET OF THE DESERT BIGHORN SHEEP (OVIS CANADENSIS WEEMSI), IN BAJA CALIFORNIA SUR, MEXICO
Bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) once numbered in the millions across the western United States (Buechner, 1960; Berger, 1990); however, due to uncontrolled harvest and diseases introduced from domestic sheep, bighorn numbers began to plummet around the turn of the 20th century (Buechner, 1960; Berger, 1990).
(2003) found that bighorn sheep, Ovis canadensis mexicana, had no difference in time budget between the sexes.
(2003) found that in desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis mexicana) male and female groups did not differ in foraging time, moreover time spent moving, resting, or ruminating between the sexes showed no differences as predicted by the "activity budget hypothesis".
Shackleton (1985) had reported an absence of records of abnormal coloration in bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) despite published reports of white-colored individuals (Jonez 1958; Hansen 1965a; Cooper 1974; O'Connor 1974; Wilson et al.
Ovis canadensis was wiped out of most of its traditional habitat by the middle of last century because of susceptibility to diseases and parasites carried by domestic sheep, unregulated market hunting, and competition with domestic livestock, and today, opportunities to hunt are extremely rare and prized.
In Arizona, however, agave was rarely used by desert mule deer or bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis; Krausman et al., 1989; Cain et al., 2008).