Owenism


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Related to Owenism: Fourierists

Owenism

the principles of social and labor reform along communistic lines developed by Robert Owen (1771-1858). — Owenite, n.
See also: Economics
the social and political theories of Robert Owen, an early 19th-century British reformer whose emphasis upon cooperative education and living led to the founding of communal experiments, including the ill-fated community of New Harmony, Indiana, purchased from the Rappites. — Owenite, n.
See also: Communalism
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Owenism, Saint-Simonianism, Marxism- Leninism, Trotskyism, Maoism), its appeal is bound to be a limited affair, which might not "win [world citizens] over for [Honneth's] project" any time soon, but a handful of well-meaning academics (101).
Guarneri, The Utopian Alternative: Fourierism in Nineteenth-Century America (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1991), 103.1 include those engaging with Owenism, the Working Men's Party, or its successor, the Equal Rights Party.
The wealth of information provided by the authors will serve anyone interested in New Lanark, Robert Owen and Owenism, theories of community development, conditions and change during the industrial revolution, or successful methods of historic site restoration.
Meanwhile the repudiation of Christianity and of Judaeo-Christian morality evident in both Fourierism and Owenism is still very much a feature of the modern Left --the ideological heirs of Owen, Fourier, and their ilk.
The co-operative movement that grew out of northern Chartism and Owenism offered a home-grown working-class solution to immediate 'consumer' issues, but it also offered a 'new moral world' based on co-operative communities.
He discussed class antagonism, Owenism, the poor laws, and factory conditions, and pushed for the ballot and an extension of the suffrage.
Social democrats are often dismissive of co-operatives and the like - seen as a species of 'Owenism' from which they turned aside long ago, or indulged as worthy but irrelevant curiosities.
Owenism did not clash with these ideas but, rather, complemented them.
From New Lanark to Mound Bayou; Owenism in the Mississippi delta.
(30) Anarchism insisted on a total social revolution--encompassing the private family as well as labor and capital--and in this way resembled early-nineteenth-century utopian movements such as Owenism, which also had many women followers.
Although Cordery tries to show that this traditional view of friendly societies as generally apolitical bodies underestimates their political engagement, he admits that compared to trade unions or representatives of Owenism, the friendly societies' political activity beyond the "defense of voluntarism and respectability" (2003, 5) was negligible (58ff.
In The People's Farm (1988) he argues that, after Cato Street, the Spenceans returned to first principles and went on to help shape Chartism, Owenism and the co-operative movement.