Owenism

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Owenism

the principles of social and labor reform along communistic lines developed by Robert Owen (1771-1858). — Owenite, n.
See also: Economics
the social and political theories of Robert Owen, an early 19th-century British reformer whose emphasis upon cooperative education and living led to the founding of communal experiments, including the ill-fated community of New Harmony, Indiana, purchased from the Rappites. — Owenite, n.
See also: Communalism
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The Owenites in England, and the Fourierists in France, respectively, oppose the Chartists and the Reformistes.
(470) Owenites in Indiana, in UTOPIAS: SOCIAL IDEALS AND COMMUNAL
As regards the history of socialism (chapters I & II), the little-known roots of the term itself belong to "Catholic theologians" of the 18 th century, who "referred to a tendency in the works of Grotius and Pufendorf" to assume that "the legal order of society should be founded on the human need for 'sociality' rather than divine revelation." (6) Better known is the use of this term by 19th-century Owenites "in England and the Fourierists in France", who were horrified by "the misery of the working masses" under the prevailing "economic sphere", which had clearly betrayed the melioristic aspirations of "the French Revolution" (7-9).
By Socialists, in 1847, were understood, on the one hand the adherents of the various Utopian systems: Owenites in England, Fourierists in France, both of them already reduced to the position of mere sects, and gradually dying out; on the other hand, the most multifarious social quacks who, by all manner of tinkering, professed to redress, without any danger to capital and profit, all sorts of social grievances, in both cases men outside the working-class movement, and looking rather to the "educated" classes for support.
I think this community [Oneida]--like the Shakers, like the Owenites, like Twin Oaks--provides that stimulus to self-reflection.
Many of the non-Jewish persons involved in the JMIS were radicals, reformists, Owenites, Chartists, and activists for the advancement and improvement of the working classes.
These local associational economies, in their most extreme form, took the form of joint-stock Utopian communities like those of the Owenites and the Fourierist associations that many of the Patriot leaders joined; "Endless sterile debates over the tariff and internal improvements convinced most Associationists that the communitarian method of sidestepping politics was a far better alternative than pressing for social legislation." (102)
JENNINGS BEGINS his history of five utopian movements--the Shakers, the Owenites, the Fourierists, the Icarians, and Oneida--from a position of sympathy.
But it would surely be a mistake to literally follow Kropotkin in claiming that Lao Tze in ancient China, or Zeno in ancient Greece, were literally anarchists, or to suggest, as Rocker almost does, that the Owenites were syndicalists.
The word seems to have been first used among the Owenites in the early 1820s.
Far from being marginal, in later years in the UK, abstinence from meat was actively encouraged by significant Christian identities such as John Wesley and Charles Spurgeon, as well as a number of small groups such as the Sacred Socialists, Concordists, Owenites, Chartists, White Quakers and even the Salvation Army (pp.