oxbow

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Related to Oxbows: oxbow lake

ox·bow

 (ŏks′bō′)
n.
1. A U-shaped piece of wood that fits under and around the neck of an ox, with its upper ends attached to the bar of the yoke.
2.
a. A U-shaped bend in a river.
b. The land within such a bend of a river.

ox′bow′ adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

oxbow

(ˈɒksˌbəʊ)
n
1. (Agriculture) a U-shaped piece of wood fitted under and around the neck of a harnessed ox and attached to the yoke
2. (Physical Geography) Also called: oxbow lake or cutoff a small curved lake lying on the flood plain of a river and constituting the remnant of a former meander
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ox•bow

(ˈɒksˌboʊ)

n.
1. a U-shaped piece of wood placed under and around the neck of an ox with its upper ends in the bar of the yoke.
2.
a. a bow-shaped bend in a river, or the land embraced by it.
b. Also called ox′bow lake′. a bow-shaped lake formed in a former channel of a river.
adj.
3. having a compound curve with a concave section between two convex ones.
[1325–75]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

ox·bow

(ŏks′bō′)
A sharp, U-shaped bend in a river. ♦ When a river changes its course and cuts through the strip of land in the middle of an oxbow, the water that remains in the former oxbow loop is called an oxbow lake.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.oxbow - the land inside an oxbow bend in a riveroxbow - the land inside an oxbow bend in a river
dry land, ground, solid ground, terra firma, earth, land - the solid part of the earth's surface; "the plane turned away from the sea and moved back over land"; "the earth shook for several minutes"; "he dropped the logs on the ground"
2.oxbow - a U-shaped curve in a stream
meander - a bend or curve, as in a stream or river
3.oxbow - a wooden framework bent in the shape of a U; its upper ends are attached to the horizontal yoke and the loop goes around the neck of an ox
framework - a structure supporting or containing something
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

oxbow

[ˈɒksˌbəʊ] oxbow lake Nlago m en forma de herradura
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in classic literature ?
Longfellow, I believe, is not yet at the Oxbow, else the winged horse would neigh at him.
Fish were sampled in oxbows using methods similar to those used by Bakevich el id.
Launched in 2015, Oxbows monitoring services allow parents to view, approve, and reject postings on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.
Nesting activity observed in 2007-2009 on two oxbows (Oxbow 1 and Oxbow 2) at Tishomingo NWR showed that nests made by the reintroduced females tended to be clustered, within and among years.
Over time, these loops became U-shaped ponds, known as oxbows, which reconnected to the stream only during high water periods.
Millions of mallard ducks winter on the sloughs and oxbows that collect mast as winter rains cover the lowlands.
Arkansas' waterfowling variety can include teal in reservoirs, snow geese in winter wheat fields or gadwalls in river oxbows.
This river scores the prairie's tender hand, a curved lifeline plaited with oxbow lakes.
Although vast numbers of the best big trees went to the sawmill early in the century, many survived, protected by a network of swamps and wild river oxbows. Many also survived in part because of a bird that seeks out the sloughs of the Cache and White Rivers in much the same manner that winter-weary northerners flock to sunnier climes when north winds begin to howl.