Oxidability

Ox`i`da`bil´i`ty


n.1.Capability of being converted into an oxide.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in periodicals archive ?
AB-5 displays better inhibition to MCF-7, A549, and HepG2 than stigmasterol, inferring that the chlorine atom with oxidability in the derivative plays an vital role in the antitumor activity.
After oxygen enrichment of the sintered ore, the sintering atmosphere shows a certain degree of oxidability. At the same time, the magnetite content in the sintered ore after the oxygen enrichment is decreased.
The mean value of Eh in karst aquifers was far higher than that in granular and fissured aquifers, indicating that the oxidability of karst aquifers in the PRD was commonly stronger than other two types of aquifers.
The [beta]-dancane value can reflect of the oxidability of the formation environment of crude oil.
Meanwhile, it is believed that hydroxyl radical is one of the most strong oxidability matters.
The oxidability of SeMet during storage could explain different results in terms of gene expression between SeMet-supplemented and SeYeast-supplemented group of mice (Barger et al., 2012).
(2006) Exercise training improves low-density lipoprotein oxidability in untrained subjects with coronary artery disease.
The enhanced TC degradation by birnessite resulted directly from MI and the oxidability of birnessite [23].
This work is about the physical characterization (pH, conductivity, dry residue at 180[degrees]C, total hardness and oxidability) and chemical composition (main anions and cations by High Performance Ion Chromatography, HPIC, and elements by Inductively Coupled Plasma --Atomic Emission Spectroscopy, ICP-AES), of waters collected in ten different points of the Jarama river basin and its tributaries.