oxidative stress

(redirected from Oxidant stress)
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oxidative stress

n.
A condition of increased oxidant production in animal cells characterized by the release of free radicals and resulting in cellular degeneration.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Asthma and oxidant stress: nutritional, environmental, and genetic risk factors.
Normally, they added, the body would marshal an antioxidant defense to neutralize this oxidant stress, but CF is characterized by dietary antioxidant deficiencies.
The research team conducted a year-long study first focused on ageing mice who were given a western diet to stimulate oxidant stress to antagonize the NAKL.
Blood samples were drawn from all cases at presentation to the emergency service and oxidative stress levels (total oxidant stress [TOS] and total antioxidant stress [TAS]) were measured in the biochemistry laboratory of the Yildirim Beyazit University Faculty of Medicine.
Studies of oxidant stress and antioxidant status in patients with FMS have also revealed different results; some have demonstrated a decreased total antioxidant status compared with the control groups, [8,9,31,32] whereas other studies did not show a significant difference between the two groups.
Kharbanda et al., "Inflammation-induced endothelial dysfunction involves reduced nitric oxide bioavailability and increased oxidant stress," Cardiovascular Research, vol.
The hypothesis that APAP acts as a prooxidant in the airways and enhances the response to ETS was tested in a mouse model by determining whether APAP and/or APAP + ETS a) cause a loss of GSH, and b) activate the oxidant stress response pathway, as indicated by the activation of two NRF2-dependent genes: Gclc and Nqol.
The first recognized use for isoprostanes was using them as mediators of oxidant stress [1].
Dietary AGEs are known to contribute to increased oxidant stress and inflammation, which are linked to diabetes and cardiovascular disease.
These compounds help human body to shield oxidant stress, diseases, and cancers.
[57] suggest that measuring urinary metabolite of IsoPs is likely to be a more accurate index of systemic oxidant stress status.