Oxonian


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Ox·o·ni·an

 (ŏk-sō′nē-ən)
adj.
Of, relating to, or characteristic of Oxford or Oxford University.
n.
1. A native or inhabitant of Oxford.
2. A person who studies or has studied at Oxford University.

[From Medieval Latin Oxōnia, Oxford, from Old English Oxnaford : oxena, genitive pl. of oxa, ox + ford, ford; see ford.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Oxonian

(ɒkˈsəʊnɪən)
adj
(Placename) of or relating to Oxford or Oxford University
n
1. (Education) a member of Oxford University
2. (Placename) an inhabitant or native of Oxford
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Ox•o•ni•an

(ɒkˈsoʊ ni ən)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to Oxford, England, or to Oxford University.
n.
2. a student or graduate of Oxford University.
3. a native or inhabitant of Oxford.
[1530–40; < Medieval Latin Oxoni(a)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Oxonian

A student or former student of Oxford University.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Oxonian - a native or resident of Oxford
Oxford - a city in southern England to the northwest of London; site of Oxford University
English person - a native or inhabitant of England
Adj.1.Oxonian - of or pertaining to or characteristic of Oxford University; "Oxonian education"
2.Oxonian - of or pertaining to or characteristic of the city of Oxford, England, or its inhabitants; "his Oxonian neighbors"; "Oxonian bookstores"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Oxonian

[ɒkˈsəʊnɪən]
A. ADJoxoniense
B. Noxoniense mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Oxonian

nOxfordstudent(in) m(f)
adjder Oxforder Universität angehörend
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
The future of phonetics rests probably with his pupils, who all swore by him; but nothing could bring the man himself into any sort of compliance with the university, to which he nevertheless clung by divine right in an intensely Oxonian way.
A dark-blue oar crossed with a cherry-pink one above his mantel-piece spoke of the old Oxonian and Leander man, while the foils and boxing-gloves above and below them were the tools of a man who had won supremacy with each.
Still, by way of punishing her elder nephew, Miss Crawley persisted in being gracious to the young Oxonian. There were no limits to her kindness or her compliments when they once began.
However, as I indicate above, even leaving aside those two texts that constitute Sloane, Booklet 2, plainly post factum because inserted within the completed Booklet 1, and not readily to be aligned with any other activity in the volume, producing Sloane required a number of exemplars, in addition to the Oxonian BNF lat.
The anthology, it seems, owes its origins to a group of academics (some, incidentally, Oxonian) who have attended a nothing less than famous, intellectually challenging Victorian Studies conference and who have happened (over a collegial lunch) to recognize their all-too-similar approaches to Victorian literature and culture.
Ask Oxonian hospitality consultant and food writer Caroline Rowe, 28, who often unwinds at the spanking new symbols of India being in sync with global nightlife culture.
Despite Housman's association with Cambridge, much of his wit was Oxonian as seen in his wonderful undergraduate letters to his family.
The figure of Fanny does not stand alone; it is indissociably linked with that of her grandfather, the mail-coachman who drove that route and who watched over her and the young Oxonian's conduct.
Riding this latest craze is Britain's latest Telly-don, Niall Ferguson, one-time economic historian, one-time Oxonian, now transplanted into post 9/11 America.
"I do speak English," I pointed out, in my best Oxonian
ON an internet chatroom discussing the European Capital of Culture award, a message has been posted from a disgruntled Oxonian who sneeringly suggests that Liverpudlians will now have European Capital of Culture logos branded on their track- suits.
Not long afterwards, Mr Dzakumah -- our carpentry teacher, whose quaint pronunciation of English words made him a laughing stock behind his back (he pronounced "but" as "bet" and "must" as "mcst", which, to us who aspired to Oxonian diction, was a major failure to be mimicked to death at every opportunity -- asked me to go and give something to Mr Peasah.