Oxonian

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Ox·o·ni·an

 (ŏk-sō′nē-ən)
adj.
Of, relating to, or characteristic of Oxford or Oxford University.
n.
1. A native or inhabitant of Oxford.
2. A person who studies or has studied at Oxford University.

[From Medieval Latin Oxōnia, Oxford, from Old English Oxnaford : oxena, genitive pl. of oxa, ox + ford, ford; see ford.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Oxonian

(ɒkˈsəʊnɪən)
adj
(Placename) of or relating to Oxford or Oxford University
n
1. (Education) a member of Oxford University
2. (Placename) an inhabitant or native of Oxford
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Ox•o•ni•an

(ɒkˈsoʊ ni ən)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to Oxford, England, or to Oxford University.
n.
2. a student or graduate of Oxford University.
3. a native or inhabitant of Oxford.
[1530–40; < Medieval Latin Oxoni(a)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Oxonian

A student or former student of Oxford University.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Oxonian - a native or resident of Oxford
Oxford - a city in southern England to the northwest of London; site of Oxford University
English person - a native or inhabitant of England
Adj.1.Oxonian - of or pertaining to or characteristic of Oxford University; "Oxonian education"
2.Oxonian - of or pertaining to or characteristic of the city of Oxford, England, or its inhabitants; "his Oxonian neighbors"; "Oxonian bookstores"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Oxonian

[ɒkˈsəʊnɪən]
A. ADJoxoniense
B. Noxoniense mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Oxonian

nOxfordstudent(in) m(f)
adjder Oxforder Universität angehörend
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
The future of phonetics rests probably with his pupils, who all swore by him; but nothing could bring the man himself into any sort of compliance with the university, to which he nevertheless clung by divine right in an intensely Oxonian way.
A dark-blue oar crossed with a cherry-pink one above his mantel-piece spoke of the old Oxonian and Leander man, while the foils and boxing-gloves above and below them were the tools of a man who had won supremacy with each.
Still, by way of punishing her elder nephew, Miss Crawley persisted in being gracious to the young Oxonian. There were no limits to her kindness or her compliments when they once began.
True, his statement was not much of an advertisement for an Oxford education, but I suppose the excuse that Oxonians make would be that he was admitted because he was a cricketer, not because of his A-Level grades.
And local media pundits impressed by Bilawal's speech - even Imran clapped his desk - and expecting five years of civilised discourse between two notable Oxonians, too, are likely to be disappointed.
(5) During an August 1865 reading party, he was guilty of repeated "unkindness" to Phillimore, a friend; throughout the next six months, Hopkins also berated himself for "unkindness," "unkind feeling and petulance," and "unkind wds." toward Mamma, his brother Cyril, a locale curate, family friends, and fellow Oxonians. (6) Motives for speaking and behaving with "[v]ehemence and unkindness" (Diar., p.
In 1960, the great scholar of exegesis Beryl Smalley introduced a sequence of fourteenth-century English friars, mainly Oxonians, who exhibited what she took to be rather peculiar tastes.
Having failed my Anglo-Saxon prelims at Oxford, I was at risk of being slung out--or 'sent down, as Oxonians so gracefully put it.
Michael and Khoan's flat was as through the looking glass as anything written by Oxonians like Lewis Carroll and Philip Pullman, the ordinary giving way to the extraordinary as if by magical portal.
(22) Unsurprisingly, Anthony a Wood makes no mention of either pseudonym, 'Fuscus' or 'Turvus', in his biographical volumes on Oxonians. (23) The author's poem 'To a Friend Accusing Me because He Saw Not My Name among the Late Oxford Poets, Who Wrote in Praise of the Peace, betwixt England and Holland', (24) anticipates attempts to identify him via another Oxonian publication-presumably the verse anthology, Musarum Oxoniensium elaiophoria (1654):25 'I've no intent / Yet to be taken for a fool in print'.
Ruskin is donating the work in the hope that it will in turn be studied by Oxonians --copied again, in a continuing devotional praxis.
Joe dutifully went to the national and international conferences, and dutifully gave his papers, and he did so with genuine enthusiasm when the conference was "Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha" in Oxford, where he had many friends, not just the scholars, but also Fa(u)lkner family members, a broad range of Oxonians, and Ole Miss colleagues.