OxyContin


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Related to OxyContin: Percocet, oxycodone, Oxynorm

Ox·y·Con·tin

 (ŏk′sē-kŏn′tn)
A trademark for the drug oxycodone hydrochloride.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

OxyContin

(ˌɒksɪˈkɒntɪn)
n
(Pharmacology) an opiate drug, oxycodone hydrochloride, used as a painkiller and, illegally, as an alternative to heroin
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in periodicals archive ?
Over the last two decades, the opioid analgesic OxyContin has
The socialite visited her at the hotel Chateau Marmont with an unnamed friend who had a bag full of prescription drugs including Oxycontin.
The Food and Drug Administration recently approved the use of OxyContin for children 11 to 16 years old with severe pain.
WASHINGTON -- The maker of OxyContin says it has completed testing of an abuse-resistant version of the painkiller hydrocodone, a surprise development that could derail sales of the recently launched Zohydro, a similar medication that has been criticized for lacking such safeguards.
Like OxyContin, Zohydro is a "pure narcotic"; but unlike OxyContin, the Zohydro set to be released isn't tamper resistant, and can easily be crushed, then snorted or injected.
M2 PHARMA-December 4, 2013-Impax Laboratories settles OxyContin patent litigation with Purdue Pharma
She is understandably concerned that youngsters are just a mouse click away from getting their hands on powerful prescription drug OxyContin.
IN APRIL, THE FOOD AND DRUG Administration (FDA) determined that OxyContin (oxycodone hydrochloride) extended-release tablets approved under New Drug Application (NDA) 20-533 (Original OxyContin) were withdrawn from sale for safety reasons.
TO DISCOURAGE misuse and abuse of the prescription painkiller OxyContin, federal officials recently approved a new formulation of the controlled-release drug.
In an 11th-hour action that derailed the possibility of generic formulations of controlled-release oxycodone (OxyContin) from appearing on the U.S.
"We applaud FDA Commissioner Hamburg's announcement that the FDA will not approve any abbreviated new drug applications that rely upon the approval of original OxyContin which did not have abuse-deterrent properties," the lawmakers said in a statement.
Now the battle against painkillers such as OxyContin has become even that much harder.