oxybutynin

(redirected from Oxybutinin)
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ox·y·bu·ty·nin

 (ŏk′sē-byo͞ot′n-ĭn)
n.
An anticholinergic drug, C22H31NO3, used to treat incontinence and other urinary symptoms.

[oxy- + but- + -yn(e) + -in.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

oxybutynin

n oxibutinina
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Temiz aralikli kateterizasyon, antikolinerjik ilaclar (AAD icin oxybutinin, tolterodin, desmopressin), DSD'si icin doksazosin, ilac tedavisine yanit olmayan AAD'de detrusor kasa botulinum toksin tip A (BTX-A) enjeksiyonu ve bu tedaviye yanit alinmazsa cerrahi uygulamalar (augmentasyon sistoplastisi, denervasyon cerrahisi, vb.) onerilmektedir.
We prospectively studied a cohort of pediatric patients with DO/NDO refractory or intolerant to adjusted oxybutinin or tolterodine treatment and intended to optimize the medical therapy by introducing solifenacin (Vesicare, Astellas).
Delirium did not occur in either group, and only one person taking oxybutinin developed urinary retention.
* Antimuscarinic agents, used to treat overactive bladder, including oxybutinin (Ditropan) and benzhexol hydrochloride (Benzhexol)
The UROS Infusor is capable of delivering IOXY[TM] (oxybutinin), a drug for the treatment of overactive bladder, to patients effectively while lessening the side effects exhibited by patients who took the drug orally.
To treat this problem, oxybutinin has been a drug of choice for many years.
Appropriately evaluated elderly residents can benefit from a pharmacologic trial of oxybutinin chloride (Ditropan) for urge incontinence, and for those residents in whom stress incontinence is a predominant feature, periurethral bulking agents, i.e., collagen injections, may be indicated; these are relatively noninvasive, although they typically require more than one administration.