L-plate

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L-plate

n
(Automotive Engineering) Brit a white rectangle with an "L" sign fixed to the back and front of a motor vehicle; a red "L" sign is used to show that a driver using it is a learner who has not passed the driving test; a green "L" sign may be displayed by new drivers for up to a year after passing the driving test
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.L-plate - a square plate bearing the letter L that is attached to both ends of a car to indicate that the driver is a learner
plate - a sheet of metal or wood or glass or plastic
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
Translations

L-plate

[ˈelpleɪt] N(placa f de) la L > DRIVING LICENCE/DRIVER'S LICENSE

L-plate

(ˈel ˌpleit) noun
a sign with the letter L (short for learner) on it that is attached to a car driven by a learner-driver.
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References in periodicals archive ?
We tend also to cut a bit of slack to new drivers whose green P-plates indicate they have just passed their test.
Getting through the red refers to young drivers first year of red P-plates. During this year, the first six months are the most dangerous, when young drivers are at their highest risk of having a crash.
George Institute researcher Dr Teresa Senserrick said young drivers should be handed P-plates at 18 and full restrictions lifted at 21.
Our campaign calls for drivers under 25 to take a Pass Plus test, wear P-plates and a limit on the number of passengers.
"Young drivers should display P-plates for three years and should not be allowed to drive in the dark.
It's nothing we didn't do when we were youngsters but we were lucky.' In addition to 200 hours of taught instruction, he said drivers who pass their test should be made to display P-plates and should log another 100 hours of driving before being allowed to take passengers.
Not only would they have to show P-plates on their vehicles but they would be prevented -by law -from driving on motorways, driving at night, carrying more than one passenger or driving a car with an engine greater than 1.2 litres until they have completed additional training.