particulate matter

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particulate matter

n. Abbr. PM
Material suspended in the air in the form of minute solid particles or liquid droplets, especially when considered as an atmospheric pollutant.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.particulate matter - a small discrete mass of solid or liquid matter that remains individually dispersed in gas or liquid emissions (usually considered to be an atmospheric pollutant)
material, stuff - the tangible substance that goes into the makeup of a physical object; "coal is a hard black material"; "wheat is the stuff they use to make bread"
dust - fine powdery material such as dry earth or pollen that can be blown about in the air; "the furniture was covered with dust"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Statistical analysis indicated that there was a significant difference in the concentration levels of PM10 between studied and comparative areas, suggested that the preschool locations might contribute to the concentration of the particulates.
"Neighbouring regions, Lorraine and Franche-Comte, have registered pollution peaks this week comparable to what we are seeing in Alsace." The city of Brussels, according to the Brussels Environment Management Institute, has had between 16 and 29 days during which thresholds for PM10 particulate matter were exceeded in 2013.
PM stands for particular matter, meaning the amount of solid and liquid particles found in the air, and PM10, measured in parts per million or ppm, refers to the big particles that are between 2.5 and 10 micrometers.
In Ahvaz, the average level of PM10 is estimated at a "hazardous" 372.
The analysis on COPD, related specially to PM10 and NO2 according with F Fisher test has showed in accordance worldwide scientific literature.
There are many other elements of air pollution, but PM10 measures one of the most harmful.
The annual average PM10 concentration was significantly higher in polluted cities (50.95 mg/m3) compared to unpolluted cities (26.62 mg/m3).
Cong Liu, from the Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety at Fudan University in Shanghai, and colleagues examined the correlations for PM10 and PM2.5 with daily all-cause, cardiovascular, and respiratory mortality.
The dust, dirt, soot and smoke (PM10 ) are highest during the day and are clearly visible.