receptor

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re·cep·tor

 (rĭ-sĕp′tər)
n.
1. Physiology A specialized cell or group of nerve endings that responds to sensory stimuli.
2. Biochemistry A molecular structure or site on the surface or interior of a cell that binds with substances such as hormones, antigens, or neurotransmitters or is activated by events such as a change in the concentration of an ion.

receptor

(rɪˈsɛptə)
n
1. (Physiology) physiol a sensory nerve ending that changes specific stimuli into nerve impulses
2. any of various devices that receive information, signals, etc

re•cep•tor

(rɪˈsɛp tər)

n.
1. a protein molecule, usu. on the surface of a cell, that is capable of binding to a complementary molecule, as a hormone, antibody, or antigen.
2. a sensory nerve ending or sense organ that is sensitive to stimuli.
[1900–05]

re·cep·tor

(rĭ-sĕp′tər)
1. A nerve ending specialized to sense or receive stimuli. Skin receptors respond to stimuli such as touch and pressure and signal the brain by activating portions of the nervous system. Receptors in the nose detect odors.
2. A cell structure or site that is capable of combining with a hormone, antigen, or other chemical substance.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.receptor - a cellular structure that is postulated to exist in order to mediate between a chemical agent that acts on nervous tissue and the physiological responsereceptor - a cellular structure that is postulated to exist in order to mediate between a chemical agent that acts on nervous tissue and the physiological response
anatomical structure, bodily structure, body structure, complex body part, structure - a particular complex anatomical part of a living thing; "he has good bone structure"
alpha receptor, alpha-adrenergic receptor, alpha-adrenoceptor - receptors postulated to exist on nerve cell membranes of the sympathetic nervous system in order to explain the specificity of certain agents that affect only some sympathetic activities (such as vasoconstriction and relaxation of intestinal muscles and contraction of smooth muscles)
beta receptor, beta-adrenergic receptor, beta-adrenoceptor - receptors postulated to exist on nerve cell membranes of the sympathetic nervous system in order to explain the specificity of certain agents that affect only some sympathetic activities (such as vasodilation and increased heart beat)
2.receptor - an organ having nerve endings (in the skin or viscera or eye or ear or nose or mouth) that respond to stimulationreceptor - an organ having nerve endings (in the skin or viscera or eye or ear or nose or mouth) that respond to stimulation
lateral line, lateral line organ - sense organs of fish and amphibians; believed to detect pressure changes in the water
organ - a fully differentiated structural and functional unit in an animal that is specialized for some particular function
enteroceptor, interoceptor - any receptor that responds to stimuli inside the body
exteroceptor - any receptor that responds to stimuli outside the body
pineal eye, third eye - a sensory structure capable of light reception located on the dorsal side of the diencephalon in various reptiles
baroreceptor - a sensory receptor that responds to pressure
chemoreceptor - a sensory receptor that responds to chemical stimuli
thermoreceptor - a sensory receptor that responds to heat and cold
eye, oculus, optic - the organ of sight
ear - the sense organ for hearing and equilibrium
organ of hearing - the part of the ear that is responsible for sensations of sound
inner ear, internal ear, labyrinth - a complex system of interconnecting cavities; concerned with hearing and equilibrium
semicircular canal - one of three tube loops filled with fluid and in planes nearly at right angles with one another; concerned with equilibrium
stretch receptor - a receptor in a muscle that responds to stretching of the muscle tissue
papilla - a small nipple-shaped protuberance concerned with taste, touch, or smell; "the papillae of the tongue"
sensory system - the body's system of sense organs
effector - an organ (a gland or muscle) that becomes active in response to nerve impulses
Translations

receptor

[rɪˈseptəʳ] N (Physiol, Rad) → receptor m

receptor

[rɪˈsɛptər] n (ANATOMY)récepteur m

receptor

n
(= nerve)Reizempfänger m, → Rezeptor m
(Rad) → Empfänger m

receptor

[rɪˈsɛptəʳ] nrecettore m

re·cep·tor

n. receptor, terminación nerviosa que recibe un estímulo y lo transmite a otros nervios;
auditory ______ auditivo;
contact ______ de contacto;
mechanoreceptormecanoreceptor;
chemoreceptorquimoreceptor;
proprioceptive ______ propioceptivo;
sensory ______ sensorial;
taste ______ gustativo;
temperature ______ de temperatura.

receptor

n receptor m; estrogen receptor-positive positivo para receptores de estrógeno
References in periodicals archive ?
Along the eastern seaboard of the United States, Fine (1978) recorded toadfish boatwhistle calls beginning in May when water temperature was 15.7 [degrees]C and lasting through October with temperature effects observed on PRR but not on call duration and amplitude.
Statistical analysis: The threshold for statistical significance was predefined as a PRR of [greater than or equal to]2.0 with a Chi-squared test statistic of [greater than or equal to]4.0, at least three reports (n [greater than or equal to]3) of that preferred term (PT), IC with IC-2SD>0 and ROR with ROR-1.96SE>1.
The local address is transferred in parallel with the data (as the USER channel of AXI4-stream) until reaching its required PRR. The interface is also responsible to buffer or release the traffic.
In our model variable order is as follow: rmir, ppi, gap and prr. All series included in empirical analysis are sourced from REIDIN except real mortgage interest rates, rmir obtained from Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey (CBRT).
The significance of the FN in European populist politics, and its long history, make it a significant case for examining the PRR gendered strategies and the evolution of PRR discourse on gender over time.
By changing the maximum number of access in RR and PRR, system can control computer resources for processing priority access.
In the 1970s, use of the PRR emerged as a conservative approach to dental amalgam.
Influence of Age on Expressions of PRR, ACE, ACE2, and Ang II and Serum Levels of Ang II and Renin.
Preventive resin restoration with resin plus un- filled resin (PRR) was the first choice (64%) followed by fissure sealant (FS) using unfilled resin (39%).
They will obtain private residence relief (PRR) (i.e.
Para ello, reconocen los patrones moleculares asociados a patogenos o a dano (PAMP o DAMP por las siglas en ingles de pathogen-associated molecular patterns y damage-associated molecular patterns, respectivamente), mediante los receptores de reconocimiento de patrones (PRR), lo que activa su respuesta efectora.