PSBR


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Related to PSBR: PSDR

PSBR

(in Britain) abbreviation for
(Economics) public sector borrowing requirement: the excess of government expenditure over receipts (mainly from taxation) that has to be financed by borrowing from the banks or the public
Translations

PSBR

[ˌpiːɛsbiːˈɑːr] n abbr (British) (=public sector borrowing requirement) → besoins mpl de financement du secteur public mesure des emprunts effectués par le secteur public pour financer son déficit
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References in periodicals archive ?
Rossi et al., "Arabidopsis plants lacking PsbQ and PsbR subunits of the oxygen-evolving complex show altered PSII super-complex organization and short-term adaptive mechanisms," The Plant Journal, vol.
The strong fiscal performance expected this year, when Mexico will post its first primary surplus since 2008, will also help reduce the PSBR. Forecast outturns for 2017 have been boosted by the transfer of central bank profits worth 1.5% of GDP to the Treasury, but even without similar one-off contributions another primary surplus is forecast for 2018.
Personally, I think of them as PSBRs. PSB--Pistol Stabilizing Brace.
With the SIG "NotAStock" (as I have termed them) installed, they suddenly become pseu-do-SBRs--what I'll call PSBRs. The ATF has specifically stated that pistols with these braces installed can be fired from the shoulder while still legally remaining a pistol.
Allahverdiyeva et al., "Psbr, a missing link in the assembly of the oxygen-evolving complex of plant photosystem II," Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol.
Thus, the public sector borrowing requirement (PSBR) rose from about 8 percent of GDP in the 1960s and 1970s to more than 11.5 percent in 1990, the year preceding the crisis and reform (Lal 2005: Table 12.1).
The 2007 budget is expected to be balanced, as targeted, and the public sector borrowing requirement (PSBR) should remain around 1 1/2 per cent of GDP.
The Public Sector Borrowing Requirement (PSBR) is high, but within acceptable limits if growth meets the Chancellor's forecasts.
The table reflects that the public sector borrowing requirement (PSBR) ratio stood around 10% on average between 1990-1999, and continued to rise then after.
Yes, the government has been disclosing the contingent liabilities represented by the Pidiregas projects in the broader measure of the public sector deficit, the PSBR. But, those liabilities didn't show up in the foreign debt to GDP ratio.
In exchange, the investment in new communities should be freed from the straitjacket of the PSBR.
In the UK, PFI creates new infrastructure without it appearing in the report on capital budgeting--the Public Sector Borrowing Requirement (PSBR).