PAC


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PAC 1

 (păk)
n.
A private entity formed by business, labor, or other special-interest groups that can raise money to use for support of a political party or campaign but typically is required to abide by limits on contributions and expenditures.

[p(olitical) a(ction) c(ommittee).]

PAC 2

abbr.
premature atrial contraction

pac

also pack  (păk)
n.
1. A moccasin or soft shoe worn inside a boot.
2. A shoepac.

[Short for shoepac, alteration (influenced by shoe) of pidgin Delaware seppock, shoe, from Unami Delaware chípahko, shoes.]

PAC

abbreviation for
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) Pan-Africanist Congress

pac

(pæk)

n.
1. a soft, heelless shoe worn as a liner inside an overshoe.
[1870–75, Amer.; extracted from shoepac]

PAC

(pæk)

n., pl. PAC's, PACs.
political action committee.

Pac.

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.PAC - committee formed by a special-interest group to raise money for their favorite political candidatesPAC - committee formed by a special-interest group to raise money for their favorite political candidates
commission, committee - a special group delegated to consider some matter; "a committee is a group that keeps minutes and loses hours" - Milton Berle
Translations

PAC

abbr premature atrial contraction. V. contraction.
References in periodicals archive ?
Following are answers to the most frequently asked questions about NAA PAC.
The other 20 members of the task force received on average $20,892 from the PAC in 1995.
But while NRO operations are no doubt concealed from many members of Congress, huge PAC contributions from leading NRO contractors such as Martin Marietta, TRW, and Rock, well have assured that the agency's congressional overseers simply rubber-stamp its projects.
And unlike Majority Leader Richard Gephardt, the leading House recipient of PAC contributions ($650,000 during 1989-90), Foley does not loudly proclaim his commitment to reform and then quietly soak the PACs.
This year, given how our contributions were swamped in 1994, we're considerably reducing the amount of PAC checks we write and are instead developing a "Dirty Dozen" campaign to tell the public about 12 of the most anti-environmental congresspeople.
President Reagan had agreed to host a reception for him, but PAC responses to the $1,000-a-plate function were lukewarm.
But Ed Markey's PAC didn't spend Eula McNabb's $100 on helping candidates.