Pacific sardine


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Noun1.Pacific sardine - small pilchards common off the pacific coast of North AmericaPacific sardine - small pilchards common off the pacific coast of North America
Sardina pilchardus, pilchard, sardine - small fishes found in great schools along coasts of Europe; smaller and rounder than herring
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Pacific sardine, Sardinops sagax, is the main species caught, representing over 70% of landings, although other species such as northern anchovy (Engraulis mordax), Pacific thread herring (Opisthonema libertate, O.
In the case of the U.S., Dan Nosowitz wrote in his article "Regulators Vote To Halt All Pacific Sardine Fishing" that appeared in the April 17, 2015 issue of Modern Farmer, the ban comes after a "desperately bad season."
8 SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA BIGHT AERIAL SURVEY TO ASSESS PACIFIC SARDINE DISTRIBUTION AND ABUNDANCE
Reconstruction of the history of Pacific sardine biomass over the past two millennia from sediments showed that sardines tend to vary over a period of about 60 years (Baumgartner et al., 1992).
They found that if they removed just one measurement from their model--sea surface temperature as recorded at the Scripps pier--it became less accurate at tracking observed Pacific sardine populations off the California coast over the previous 50 years.
Abstract--During the last century, the population of Pacific sardine (Sardinops sagax) in the California Current Ecosystem has exhibited large fluctuations in abundance and migration behavior.
This fishery is multispecific and includes eight species, although, the Pacific sardine (Sardinops sagax) is the dominant species (about 80 % of the total landings) (Nevarez-Martinez et al.
By 2002, Canada's cod industry was not alone in its demise: Pacific sardine, haddock, Bering wolfish, Atlantic halibut, and yellowtail flounder all were on the international endangered-species list.
A remarkable exception is provided by the Pacific sardine Sardinops caerulea, for which subfossil deposits of scales have generated estimates of population size over the past two millennia, a time scale seldom accessible to ecologists (Soutar and Isaacs 1974, Baumgartner et al.

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