palaeontology

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palaeontology

(ˌpælɪɒnˈtɒlədʒɪ)
n
1. (Palaeontology) the study of fossils to determine the structure and evolution of extinct animals and plants and the age and conditions of deposition of the rock strata in which they are found. See also palaeobotany, palaeozoology
2. (Palaeontology) another name for palaeozoology
[C19: from palaeo- + onto- + -logy]
palaeontological adj
ˌpalaeˌontoˈlogically adv
ˌpalaeonˈtologist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

paleontology, palaeontology

1. the science of the forms of life existing in prior geologie periods from their fossilized remains.
2. an article on paleontology. — paleontologist. palaeontologist, n.paleontologie, palaeontologic, paleontological, palaeontological, adj.
See also: Fossils
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.palaeontology - the earth science that studies fossil organisms and related remainspalaeontology - the earth science that studies fossil organisms and related remains
frill - (paleontology) a bony plate that curves upward behind the skull of many ceratopsian dinosaurs
palaeobiology, paleobiology - a branch of paleontology that deals with the origin and growth and structure of fossil animals and plants as living organisms
earth science - any of the sciences that deal with the earth or its parts
micropaleontology - the paleontology of microfossils
vertebrate paleontology - the paleontology of vertebrates
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

palaeontology

[ˌpælɪɒnˈtɒlədʒɪ] Npaleontología f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

palaeontology

paleontology [ˌpæliɒnˈtɒlədʒi] npaléontologie f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

palaeontology

paleontology (Am) [ˌpælɪɒnˈtɒlədʒɪ] npaleontologia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
I am aware that two palaeontologists, whose opinions are worthy of much deference, namely Bronn and Woodward, have concluded that the average duration of each formation is twice or thrice as long as the average duration of specific forms.
The remark of that admirable palaeontologist, the late Edward Forbes, should not be forgotten, namely, that numbers of our fossil species are known and named from single and often broken specimens, or from a few specimens collected on some one spot.
In fact, this nearly exact balancing between the supply of sediment and the amount of subsidence is probably a rare contingency; for it has been observed by more than one palaeontologist, that very thick deposits are usually barren of organic remains, except near their upper or lower limits.