Paleozoic


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Pa·le·o·zo·ic

 (pā′lē-ə-zō′ĭk)
adj.
Of, relating to, or being the era of geologic time from about 542 to 251 million years ago. The Paleozoic Era includes the Cambrian, Ordovician, Silurian, Devonian, Mississippian, Pennsylvanian, and Permian Periods and is characterized by the appearance of marine invertebrates, primitive fishes, land plants, and primitive reptiles. The end of this era is marked by the largest recorded mass extinction in the earth's history, in which 90 percent of marine life forms were wiped out. See Table at geologic time.
n.
The Paleozoic Era.

Pa•le•o•zo•ic

(ˌpeɪ li əˈzoʊ ɪk; esp. Brit. ˌpæl i-)

adj.
1. noting or pertaining to a geologic era occurring between 570 million and 230 million years ago, when fish, insects, and reptiles first appeared.
n.
2. the Paleozoic Era or group of systems.
[1830–40; paleo- + -zoic]

Pa·le·o·zo·ic

(pā′lē-ə-zō′ĭk)
The era of geologic time from about 540 to 245 million years ago. The Paleozoic Era is characterized by the appearance of marine invertebrate animals, primitive fish and reptiles, and land plants. See Chart at geologic time.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Paleozoic - from 544 million to about 230 million years agoPaleozoic - from 544 million to about 230 million years ago
Permian, Permian period - from 280 million to 230 million years ago; reptiles
Carboniferous, Carboniferous period - from 345 million to 280 million years ago
Age of Fishes, Devonian, Devonian period - from 405 million to 345 million years ago; preponderance of fishes and appearance of amphibians and ammonites
Silurian, Silurian period - from 425 million to 405 million years ago; first air-breathing animals
Ordovician, Ordovician period - from 500 million to 425 million years ago; conodonts and ostracods and algae and seaweeds
Cambrian, Cambrian period - from 544 million to about 500 million years ago; marine invertebrates
Adj.1.Paleozoic - of or relating to or denoting the Paleozoic era
Translations

Paleozoic

adjpaläozoisch
References in periodicals archive ?
It is necessary to investigate the forced vibrations of the cart--crust relatively to Paleozoic foundation for more detailed classifications of regions by intensity of vibrations furthermore.
Two summers ago, the snakehead--a hardy, aggressive species that dates hack to the Paleozoic era and can survive for a time outside of water began to turn up in ponds in Wisconsin and Maryland, devouring plants, other fish, and even small mammals.
Morgan's'' plots harken back to the Paleozoic era of comedy, when cavemen were probably doing sitcoms: Tonight, his swaggering buffoonery nearly wrecks his shy son's date with a pretty schoolmate.
The Paleozoic in the south-eastern sector is yet to be thoroughly explored.
In the largest extinction, 96% of all invertebrate life in seas -- such as trilobites -- disappeared between the Paleozoic and Mesozoic eras some 250 million years ago.
DELINEATING THE EFFECTS OF LATE PALEOZOIC DEFORMATION OF MIDDLE PALEOZOIC METAMORPHIC ISOGRADS WITH GEOTHERMOBAROMETRY.
Preliminary petrographic, cathodoluminescence, and reflected light studies on carbonate cements and associated gangue and ore m inerals have reviled a complex fluid chemistry associated with mineralization, characteristic of many Paleozoic Mississippi Valley-type deposits.
Because of this assumption, previous cladistic or computer analyses of the relationships between turtles and other reptiles based on bone characteristics only have included those reptiles living in the Paleozoic time period, which ended 225,000,000 years ago.
Mongolia's complex geology is made up of a series of arcuate, southward-concave terranes, most of Paleozoic age and divided by sub-latitudinal fault zones.
It can be described as the bounding structures of a horst complex of up-thrown Paleozoic carbonate units, the Devils Gate Limestone and the Webb formation, which hosts Carlin style gold mineralization at the Rain mine located to the NW where gold mineralization is contained in the breccia at the contact between the two units.
Being high on the Arabian Shield, Yemen had a stable geology with erratic distribution of continental sediments through the Paleozoic.